Intervention costs and cost-effectiveness of a successful telephonic intervention to promote diabetes control

Clyde B. Schechter, Hillel W. Cohen, Celia Shmukler, Elizabeth A. Walker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - To characterize the costs and cost-effectiveness of a telephonic behavioral intervention to promote glycemic control in the Improving Diabetes Outcomes study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Using the provider perspective and a time horizon to the end of the 1-year intervention, we calculate the costs of a telephonic intervention by health educators compared with an active control (print) intervention to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes. We calculate the cost-effectiveness ratios for a reduction of one percentage point in hemoglobin A1c (A1C), as well as for one participant to achieve an A1C <7%. Base-case and sensitivity analysis results are presented. RESULTS - The intervention cost $176.61 per person randomized to the telephone group to achieve a mean 0.36 percentage point of A1C improvement. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $490.58 per incremental percentage point of A1C improvement and $2,617.35 per person over a 1-year intervention in achieving the A1C goal. In probabilistic sensitivity analysis, the median (interquartile range) of per capita cost, cost per percentage point reduction in A1C, and cost per person achieving the A1C goal of <7% are $175.82 (147.32-203.56), $487.75 (356.50-718.32), and $2,312.88 (1,785.58- 3,220.78), respectively. CONCLUSIONS - The costs of a telephonic intervention for diabetes self-management support are moderate and commensurate to the modest associated improvement in glycemic control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2156-2160
Number of pages5
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume35
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012

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Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health Educators
Self Care
Telephone
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Hemoglobins
Research Design
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Intervention costs and cost-effectiveness of a successful telephonic intervention to promote diabetes control. / Schechter, Clyde B.; Cohen, Hillel W.; Shmukler, Celia; Walker, Elizabeth A.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 35, No. 11, 11.2012, p. 2156-2160.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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