INtensive versus Standard Ambulatory Blood Pressure Lowering to Prevent Functional DeclINe in the ElderlY (INFINITY)

William B. White, Ravi Marfatia, Julia Schmidt, Dorothy B. Wakefield, Richard F. Kaplan, Richard W. Bohannon, Charles B. Hall, Charles R. Guttmann, Nicola Moscufo, Douglas Fellows, Leslie Wolfson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reductions in mobility and cognitive function linked to accrual of brain microvascular disease related white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on magnetic resonance imaging can occur in older hypertensive patients in as little as 2 years. We have designed a trial evaluating 2 levels of ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) control in individuals with normal or mildly impaired mobility and cognition who have detectable cerebrovascular disease (>0.5% WMH fraction of intracranial volume) on functional outcomes. The study is a prospective randomized, open-label trial with blinded end points, in patients ages ≥75 years with elevated 24-hour systolic blood pressure (BP) (145 mm Hg in the untreated state) who do not have unstable cardiovascular disease, heart failure, or stroke. The primary and key secondary outcomes in the trial are change from baseline in mobility and cognitive function and damage to brain white matter as demonstrated by accrual of WMH volume and changes in diffusion tensor imaging. Approximately 300 patients will be enrolled, and 200 randomized to 1 of 2 levels of ABP control (intensive to achieve a goal 24-hour systolic BP of ≤130 mm Hg or standard to achieve a goal 24-hour systolic BP of ≤145 mm Hg) for a total of 36 months using similar antihypertensive regimens. The analytical approach provides 85% power to show a clinically meaningful effect in differences in mobility accompanied by quantitative differences in WMH between treatment groups. The INFINITY trial is the first to guide antihypertensive therapy using ABP monitoring rather than clinic BP to reduce cerebrovascular disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume165
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

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Blood Pressure
Cognition
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Antihypertensive Agents
Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring
Diffusion Tensor Imaging
Brain Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases
Heart Failure
Stroke
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
White Matter
Brain
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

White, W. B., Marfatia, R., Schmidt, J., Wakefield, D. B., Kaplan, R. F., Bohannon, R. W., ... Wolfson, L. (2013). INtensive versus Standard Ambulatory Blood Pressure Lowering to Prevent Functional DeclINe in the ElderlY (INFINITY). American Heart Journal, 165(3). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2012.11.008

INtensive versus Standard Ambulatory Blood Pressure Lowering to Prevent Functional DeclINe in the ElderlY (INFINITY). / White, William B.; Marfatia, Ravi; Schmidt, Julia; Wakefield, Dorothy B.; Kaplan, Richard F.; Bohannon, Richard W.; Hall, Charles B.; Guttmann, Charles R.; Moscufo, Nicola; Fellows, Douglas; Wolfson, Leslie.

In: American Heart Journal, Vol. 165, No. 3, 03.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

White, WB, Marfatia, R, Schmidt, J, Wakefield, DB, Kaplan, RF, Bohannon, RW, Hall, CB, Guttmann, CR, Moscufo, N, Fellows, D & Wolfson, L 2013, 'INtensive versus Standard Ambulatory Blood Pressure Lowering to Prevent Functional DeclINe in the ElderlY (INFINITY)', American Heart Journal, vol. 165, no. 3. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2012.11.008
White, William B. ; Marfatia, Ravi ; Schmidt, Julia ; Wakefield, Dorothy B. ; Kaplan, Richard F. ; Bohannon, Richard W. ; Hall, Charles B. ; Guttmann, Charles R. ; Moscufo, Nicola ; Fellows, Douglas ; Wolfson, Leslie. / INtensive versus Standard Ambulatory Blood Pressure Lowering to Prevent Functional DeclINe in the ElderlY (INFINITY). In: American Heart Journal. 2013 ; Vol. 165, No. 3.
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