Intakes of dietary iron and heme-iron and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study

Geoffrey C. Kabat, Amanda J. Cross, Yikyung Park, Arthur Schatzkin, Albert R. Hollenbeck, Thomas E. Rohan, Rashmi Sinha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Intakes of dietary iron and, in particular, heme iron may increase breast cancer risk because of the prooxidant properties of iron. However, few studies have examined the association of iron and heme-iron intakes with breast cancer risk. Objective: We assessed the association of intakes of dietary iron and heme iron with risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Design: We used data from the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study to assess intakes of total dietary iron, iron from meat, iron from red meat, and heme iron in relation to breast cancer risk in 116,674 postmenopausal women who completed a detailed questionnaire regarding meat preparation methods and degrees of doneness. During 6.5 y of follow-up, 3396 cases of invasive breast cancer were identified. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs. Results: After adjustment for covariates, HRs for the highest compared with the lowest quintiles of intakes of total iron, iron from meat, iron from red meat, and heme iron were all close to unity, and there were no increasing trends with increasing intakes. The multivariable-adjusted HR for the highest compared with the lowest quintile of heme-iron intake was 1.01 (95% CI: 0.89, 1.14; P for trend = 0.97). In addition, no associations were seen when iron variables were stratified by possible effect modifiers or hormone receptor status. Conclusion: The results of this large cohort study do not support an association between iron or heme-iron intakes and postmenopausal breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1478-1483
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume92
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

Fingerprint

Dietary Iron
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Heme
Iron
Breast Neoplasms
Diet
Health
Meat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Intakes of dietary iron and heme-iron and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study. / Kabat, Geoffrey C.; Cross, Amanda J.; Park, Yikyung; Schatzkin, Arthur; Hollenbeck, Albert R.; Rohan, Thomas E.; Sinha, Rashmi.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 92, No. 6, 01.12.2010, p. 1478-1483.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kabat, Geoffrey C. ; Cross, Amanda J. ; Park, Yikyung ; Schatzkin, Arthur ; Hollenbeck, Albert R. ; Rohan, Thomas E. ; Sinha, Rashmi. / Intakes of dietary iron and heme-iron and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2010 ; Vol. 92, No. 6. pp. 1478-1483.
@article{0adc20b4ac6a40a4b3d3bf7fe8479c5d,
title = "Intakes of dietary iron and heme-iron and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study",
abstract = "Background: Intakes of dietary iron and, in particular, heme iron may increase breast cancer risk because of the prooxidant properties of iron. However, few studies have examined the association of iron and heme-iron intakes with breast cancer risk. Objective: We assessed the association of intakes of dietary iron and heme iron with risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Design: We used data from the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study to assess intakes of total dietary iron, iron from meat, iron from red meat, and heme iron in relation to breast cancer risk in 116,674 postmenopausal women who completed a detailed questionnaire regarding meat preparation methods and degrees of doneness. During 6.5 y of follow-up, 3396 cases of invasive breast cancer were identified. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and 95{\%} CIs. Results: After adjustment for covariates, HRs for the highest compared with the lowest quintiles of intakes of total iron, iron from meat, iron from red meat, and heme iron were all close to unity, and there were no increasing trends with increasing intakes. The multivariable-adjusted HR for the highest compared with the lowest quintile of heme-iron intake was 1.01 (95{\%} CI: 0.89, 1.14; P for trend = 0.97). In addition, no associations were seen when iron variables were stratified by possible effect modifiers or hormone receptor status. Conclusion: The results of this large cohort study do not support an association between iron or heme-iron intakes and postmenopausal breast cancer.",
author = "Kabat, {Geoffrey C.} and Cross, {Amanda J.} and Yikyung Park and Arthur Schatzkin and Hollenbeck, {Albert R.} and Rohan, {Thomas E.} and Rashmi Sinha",
year = "2010",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3945/ajcn.2010.29753",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "92",
pages = "1478--1483",
journal = "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0002-9165",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intakes of dietary iron and heme-iron and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study

AU - Kabat, Geoffrey C.

AU - Cross, Amanda J.

AU - Park, Yikyung

AU - Schatzkin, Arthur

AU - Hollenbeck, Albert R.

AU - Rohan, Thomas E.

AU - Sinha, Rashmi

PY - 2010/12/1

Y1 - 2010/12/1

N2 - Background: Intakes of dietary iron and, in particular, heme iron may increase breast cancer risk because of the prooxidant properties of iron. However, few studies have examined the association of iron and heme-iron intakes with breast cancer risk. Objective: We assessed the association of intakes of dietary iron and heme iron with risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Design: We used data from the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study to assess intakes of total dietary iron, iron from meat, iron from red meat, and heme iron in relation to breast cancer risk in 116,674 postmenopausal women who completed a detailed questionnaire regarding meat preparation methods and degrees of doneness. During 6.5 y of follow-up, 3396 cases of invasive breast cancer were identified. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs. Results: After adjustment for covariates, HRs for the highest compared with the lowest quintiles of intakes of total iron, iron from meat, iron from red meat, and heme iron were all close to unity, and there were no increasing trends with increasing intakes. The multivariable-adjusted HR for the highest compared with the lowest quintile of heme-iron intake was 1.01 (95% CI: 0.89, 1.14; P for trend = 0.97). In addition, no associations were seen when iron variables were stratified by possible effect modifiers or hormone receptor status. Conclusion: The results of this large cohort study do not support an association between iron or heme-iron intakes and postmenopausal breast cancer.

AB - Background: Intakes of dietary iron and, in particular, heme iron may increase breast cancer risk because of the prooxidant properties of iron. However, few studies have examined the association of iron and heme-iron intakes with breast cancer risk. Objective: We assessed the association of intakes of dietary iron and heme iron with risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Design: We used data from the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study to assess intakes of total dietary iron, iron from meat, iron from red meat, and heme iron in relation to breast cancer risk in 116,674 postmenopausal women who completed a detailed questionnaire regarding meat preparation methods and degrees of doneness. During 6.5 y of follow-up, 3396 cases of invasive breast cancer were identified. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs. Results: After adjustment for covariates, HRs for the highest compared with the lowest quintiles of intakes of total iron, iron from meat, iron from red meat, and heme iron were all close to unity, and there were no increasing trends with increasing intakes. The multivariable-adjusted HR for the highest compared with the lowest quintile of heme-iron intake was 1.01 (95% CI: 0.89, 1.14; P for trend = 0.97). In addition, no associations were seen when iron variables were stratified by possible effect modifiers or hormone receptor status. Conclusion: The results of this large cohort study do not support an association between iron or heme-iron intakes and postmenopausal breast cancer.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78651272556&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78651272556&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3945/ajcn.2010.29753

DO - 10.3945/ajcn.2010.29753

M3 - Article

VL - 92

SP - 1478

EP - 1483

JO - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 6

ER -