Insulin resistance and cognition among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected adult women: The women's interagency HIV study

Victor Valcour, Pauline Maki, Peter Bacchetti, Kathryn Anastos, Howard Crystal, Mary Young, Wendy J. Mack, Mardge Cohen, Elizabeth T. Golub, Phyllis C. Tien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cognitive impairment remains prevalent in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and may be partially due to comorbidities. We postulated that insulin resistance (IR) is negatively associated with cognitive performance. We completed a cross-sectional analysis among 1547 (1201 HIV +) women enrolled in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). We evaluated the association of IR with cognitive measures among all WIHS women with concurrent fasting bloods and cognitive testing [Trails A, Trails B, and Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT)] using multiple linear regression models. A smaller subgroup also completed the Stroop test (n=1036). IR was estimated using the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA). Higher HOMA was associated with poorer performance on the SDMT, Stroop Color-Naming (SCN) trial, and Stroop interference trial, but remained statistically significant only for the SCN in models adjusting for important factors [β=3.78s (95% CI: 0.48-7.08), p=0.025, for highest vs. lowest quartile of HOMA]. HIV status did not appear to substantially impact the relationship of HOMA with SCN. There was a small but statistically significant association of HOMA and reduced neuropsychological performance on the SCN test in this cohort of women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)447-453
Number of pages7
JournalAIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2012

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Cognition
Insulin Resistance
Homeostasis
HIV
Color
Stroop Test
Linear Models
Comorbidity
Fasting
Cross-Sectional Studies
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Insulin resistance and cognition among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected adult women : The women's interagency HIV study. / Valcour, Victor; Maki, Pauline; Bacchetti, Peter; Anastos, Kathryn; Crystal, Howard; Young, Mary; Mack, Wendy J.; Cohen, Mardge; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Tien, Phyllis C.

In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, Vol. 28, No. 5, 01.05.2012, p. 447-453.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Valcour, V, Maki, P, Bacchetti, P, Anastos, K, Crystal, H, Young, M, Mack, WJ, Cohen, M, Golub, ET & Tien, PC 2012, 'Insulin resistance and cognition among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected adult women: The women's interagency HIV study', AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, vol. 28, no. 5, pp. 447-453. https://doi.org/10.1089/aid.2011.0159
Valcour, Victor ; Maki, Pauline ; Bacchetti, Peter ; Anastos, Kathryn ; Crystal, Howard ; Young, Mary ; Mack, Wendy J. ; Cohen, Mardge ; Golub, Elizabeth T. ; Tien, Phyllis C. / Insulin resistance and cognition among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected adult women : The women's interagency HIV study. In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. 2012 ; Vol. 28, No. 5. pp. 447-453.
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