Inhibition of colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) as a potential therapeutic strategy for neurodegenerative diseases: opportunities and challenges

Jinming Han, Violeta Chitu, E. Richard Stanley, Zbigniew K. Wszolek, Virginija Danylaité Karrenbauer, Robert A. Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Microglia are specialized dynamic immune cells in the central nervous system (CNS) that plays a crucial role in brain homeostasis and in disease states. Persistent neuroinflammation is considered a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington’s disease (HD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and primary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Colony stimulating factor 1-receptor (CSF-1R) is predominantly expressed on microglia and its expression is significantly increased in neurodegenerative diseases. Cumulative findings have indicated that CSF-1R inhibitors can have beneficial effects in preclinical neurodegenerative disease models. Research using CSF-1R inhibitors has now been extended into non-human primates and humans. This review article summarizes the most recent advances using CSF-1R inhibitors in different neurodegenerative conditions including AD, PD, HD, ALS and MS. Potential challenges for translating these findings into clinical practice are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number219
JournalCellular and Molecular Life Sciences
Volume79
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2022

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Colony stimulating factor-1 receptor
  • Huntington’s disease
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Parkinson’s disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Pharmacology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Cell Biology

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