Influence of smoking status on the disease-related outcomes of patients with tobacco-associated superficial transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

Neil Fleshner, Jo Anne Garland, Alyson Moadel, Harry Herr, Jaimie Ostroff, Rene Trambert, Maryellen O'Sullivan, Paul Russo

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129 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of tobacco exposure, at the time of diagnosis, on the disease-related outcomes of patients with tobacco-associated superficial transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder. METHODS. A retrospective cohort study was performed using the MSKCC Registry to identify all institutional cases of 'noninvasive' TCC (n = 1632) between 1985 and 1995. After employing exclusion criteria, 286 cases of incident tobacco-associated superficial TCC were divided into 3 strata of tobacco exposure (127 ex-smokers, 51 quitters, and 108 continued smokers) by chart review and post hoc questionnaires (n = 82). Measured outcomes included recurrence free survival and survival free of adverse events (defined a priori as disease progression or other urinary tract TCC). RESULTS. There were no significant differences among ex-smokers, quitters, and continued smokers in terms of stage, grade, tumor size, multifocality, up-front bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy, or median follow-up. Ex-smokers presented at a later age than individuals who continued to smoke. Post hoc questionnaires and chart reviews were compared in terms of smoking status at time of diagnosis, and reliability was excellent (κ = 0.89). Multivariate analyses revealed diminished recurrence free survival among continued smokers versus quitters or ex-smokers. Univariate analyses revealed diminished adverse event free survival among continued smokers versus quitters or ex- smokers. Multivariate models assessing adverse event free survival revealed a similar trend (P = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS. Continued smokers experience worse disease-associated outcomes than patients who quit smoking. Smoking cessation should thus be employed as a tertiary prevention strategy for patients with superficial TCC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2337-2345
Number of pages9
JournalCancer
Volume86
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 1999

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Keywords

  • Bladder carcinoma
  • Disease recurrence
  • Epidemiology
  • Risk factors
  • Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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