Influence of Perceived Stress on Incident Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment: Results From the Einstein Aging Study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Stress is a potentially remediable risk factor for amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Our objective is to determine whether perceived stress predicts incident aMCI and to determine if the influence of stress on aMCI is independent of known aMCI risk factors, particularly demographic variables, depression, and apolipoprotein genotype. The Einstein Aging Study is a longitudinal community-based study of older adults. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) was administered annually in the Einstein Aging Study to participants (N=507; 71 developed incident aMCI; mean follow-up time=3.6 y, SD=2.0) who were aged 70 years and older, free of aMCI and dementia at baseline PSS administration, and had at least 1 subsequent annual follow-up. Cox hazard models were used to examine time to aMCI onset adjusting for covariates. High levels of perceived stress are associated with a 30% greater risk of incident aMCI (per 5-point increase in PSS: hazard ratio=1.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.58) independent of covariates. The consistency of results after covariate adjustment and the lack of evidence for reverse causation in longitudinal analyses suggest that these findings are robust. Understanding of the effect of perceived stress on cognition may lead to intervention strategies that prevent the onset of aMCI and Alzheimer dementia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAlzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Dec 10 2015

Fingerprint

Proportional Hazards Models
Social Adjustment
Cognitive Dysfunction
Apolipoproteins
Causality
Cognition
Dementia
Alzheimer Disease
Genotype
Demography
Confidence Intervals
Depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

@article{f8566946867d4971b8c2fbab878a5d25,
title = "Influence of Perceived Stress on Incident Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment: Results From the Einstein Aging Study",
abstract = "Stress is a potentially remediable risk factor for amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Our objective is to determine whether perceived stress predicts incident aMCI and to determine if the influence of stress on aMCI is independent of known aMCI risk factors, particularly demographic variables, depression, and apolipoprotein genotype. The Einstein Aging Study is a longitudinal community-based study of older adults. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) was administered annually in the Einstein Aging Study to participants (N=507; 71 developed incident aMCI; mean follow-up time=3.6 y, SD=2.0) who were aged 70 years and older, free of aMCI and dementia at baseline PSS administration, and had at least 1 subsequent annual follow-up. Cox hazard models were used to examine time to aMCI onset adjusting for covariates. High levels of perceived stress are associated with a 30{\%} greater risk of incident aMCI (per 5-point increase in PSS: hazard ratio=1.30; 95{\%} confidence interval, 1.08-1.58) independent of covariates. The consistency of results after covariate adjustment and the lack of evidence for reverse causation in longitudinal analyses suggest that these findings are robust. Understanding of the effect of perceived stress on cognition may lead to intervention strategies that prevent the onset of aMCI and Alzheimer dementia.",
author = "Katz, {Mindy Joy} and Derby, {Carol A.} and Cuiling Wang and Sliwinski, {Martin J.} and Ali Ezzati and Zimmerman, {Molly E.} and Zwerling, {Jessica L.} and Lipton, {Richard B.}",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "10",
doi = "10.1097/WAD.0000000000000125",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders",
issn = "0893-0341",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of Perceived Stress on Incident Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

T2 - Results From the Einstein Aging Study

AU - Katz, Mindy Joy

AU - Derby, Carol A.

AU - Wang, Cuiling

AU - Sliwinski, Martin J.

AU - Ezzati, Ali

AU - Zimmerman, Molly E.

AU - Zwerling, Jessica L.

AU - Lipton, Richard B.

PY - 2015/12/10

Y1 - 2015/12/10

N2 - Stress is a potentially remediable risk factor for amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Our objective is to determine whether perceived stress predicts incident aMCI and to determine if the influence of stress on aMCI is independent of known aMCI risk factors, particularly demographic variables, depression, and apolipoprotein genotype. The Einstein Aging Study is a longitudinal community-based study of older adults. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) was administered annually in the Einstein Aging Study to participants (N=507; 71 developed incident aMCI; mean follow-up time=3.6 y, SD=2.0) who were aged 70 years and older, free of aMCI and dementia at baseline PSS administration, and had at least 1 subsequent annual follow-up. Cox hazard models were used to examine time to aMCI onset adjusting for covariates. High levels of perceived stress are associated with a 30% greater risk of incident aMCI (per 5-point increase in PSS: hazard ratio=1.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.58) independent of covariates. The consistency of results after covariate adjustment and the lack of evidence for reverse causation in longitudinal analyses suggest that these findings are robust. Understanding of the effect of perceived stress on cognition may lead to intervention strategies that prevent the onset of aMCI and Alzheimer dementia.

AB - Stress is a potentially remediable risk factor for amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Our objective is to determine whether perceived stress predicts incident aMCI and to determine if the influence of stress on aMCI is independent of known aMCI risk factors, particularly demographic variables, depression, and apolipoprotein genotype. The Einstein Aging Study is a longitudinal community-based study of older adults. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) was administered annually in the Einstein Aging Study to participants (N=507; 71 developed incident aMCI; mean follow-up time=3.6 y, SD=2.0) who were aged 70 years and older, free of aMCI and dementia at baseline PSS administration, and had at least 1 subsequent annual follow-up. Cox hazard models were used to examine time to aMCI onset adjusting for covariates. High levels of perceived stress are associated with a 30% greater risk of incident aMCI (per 5-point increase in PSS: hazard ratio=1.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.58) independent of covariates. The consistency of results after covariate adjustment and the lack of evidence for reverse causation in longitudinal analyses suggest that these findings are robust. Understanding of the effect of perceived stress on cognition may lead to intervention strategies that prevent the onset of aMCI and Alzheimer dementia.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84949604859&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84949604859&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/WAD.0000000000000125

DO - 10.1097/WAD.0000000000000125

M3 - Article

C2 - 26655068

AN - SCOPUS:84949604859

JO - Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders

JF - Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders

SN - 0893-0341

ER -