Inferring human colonization history using a copying model

Garrett Hellenthal, Adam Auton, Daniel Falush

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Genome-wide scans of genetic variation can potentially provide detailed information on how modern humans colonized the world but require new methods of analysis. We introduce a statistical approach that uses Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) data to identify sharing of chromosomal segments between populations and uses the pattern of sharing to reconstruct a detailed colonization scenario. We apply our model to the SNP data for the 53 populations of the Human Genome Diversity Project described in Conrad et al. (Nature Genetics 38,1251-60, 2006). Our results are consistent with the consensus view of a single "Out-of-Africa" bottleneck and serial dilution of diversity during global colonization, including a prominent East Asian bottleneck. They also suggest novel details including: (1) the most northerly East Asian population in the sample (Yakut) has received a significant genetic contribution from the ancestors of the most northerly European one (Orcadian). (2) Native South Americans have received ancestry from a source closely related to modern North-East Asians (Mongolians and Oroquen) that is distinct from the sources for native North Americans, implying multiple waves of migration into the Americas. A detailed depiction of the peopling of the world is available in animated form.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1000078
JournalPLoS Genetics
Volume4
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

ancestry
single nucleotide polymorphism
polymorphism
colonization
North American Indians
genome
History
history
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
human population
Population
Human Genome Project
genetic variation
dilution
Genome
sampling
world
methodology
method
Africa

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Cancer Research
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Inferring human colonization history using a copying model. / Hellenthal, Garrett; Auton, Adam; Falush, Daniel.

In: PLoS Genetics, Vol. 4, No. 5, e1000078, 05.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hellenthal, Garrett ; Auton, Adam ; Falush, Daniel. / Inferring human colonization history using a copying model. In: PLoS Genetics. 2008 ; Vol. 4, No. 5.
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