Induction of lymphokine production by EAC and of blastogenesis by soluble mitogens during human B-cell activation

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Abstract

Two groups of human lymphocytes are distinguished on the basis of immune effector functions, membrane markers and in vitro mitogen reactivity. Thymus-derived (T) lymphocytes mediate cellular immunity either directly or by secreting pharmacologically active lymphokines1, and are implicated in facilitating antibody responses2. In contrast, bone marrow-derived (B) lymphocytes are thought to produce only antibodies. Studies in the guinea pig, however, indicate that, appropriately stimulated, B cells can produce macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF)3. We have now found that the erythrocyte-antibody (19S)-complement (EAC) rosetting method, used to obtain pure human peripheral blood B cells, activates these B cells to produce mononuclear cell chemotactic (CTX) and mitogenic (MF) lymphokines. Furthermore, we have investigated the mechanism of B cell activation by EAC and the effects of mitogenic lymphokines on human T and B lymphocytes.

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Induction of lymphokine production by EAC and of blastogenesis by soluble mitogens during human B-cell activation. / Mackler, B. F.; Altman, L. C.; Rosenstreich, D. L.; Oppenheim, J. J.

In: Nature, Vol. 249, No. 5460, 01.12.1974, p. 834-837.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle