Increased serum IGF-1 levels protect the musculoskeletal system but are associated with elevated oxidative stress markers and increased mortality independent of tissue igf1 gene expression

Sebastien Elis, Yingjie Wu, Hayden William Courtland, Hui (Herb) Sun, Clifford J. Rosen, Martin L. Adamo, Shoshana Yakar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although the literature suggests a protective (anabolic) effect of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) on the musculoskeletal system during growth and aging, there is evidence that reductions in IGF-1 signaling are advantageous for promoting an increase in life span through reduction in oxidative stress-induced tissue damage. To better understand this paradox, we utilized the hepatocyte-specific IGF-1 transgenic (HIT) mice, which exhibit 3-fold increases in serum IGF-1, with normal IGF-1 expression in other tissues, and mice with an IGF-1 null background that exclusively express IGF-1 in the liver, which thereby deliver IGF-1 by the endocrine route only (KO-HIT mice). We found that in the total absence of tissue igf1 gene expression (KO-HIT), increases in serum IGF-1 levels were associated with increased levels of lipid peroxidation products in serum and increased mortality rate at 18months of age in both genders. Surprisingly, however, we found that in female mice, tissue IGF-1 plays an important role in preserving trabecular bone architecture as KO-HIT mice show bone loss in the femoral distal metaphysis. Additionally, in male KO-HIT mice, increases in serum IGF-1 levels were insufficient to protect against age-related muscle loss.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)547-550
Number of pages4
JournalAging Cell
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Musculoskeletal System
Somatomedins
Oxidative Stress
Gene Expression
Mortality
Serum
Hepatocytes
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Transgenic Mice
Anabolic Agents
Thigh
Lipid Peroxidation
Bone and Bones
Muscles
Liver

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Bone
  • IGF-1
  • Oxidative stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Aging

Cite this

Increased serum IGF-1 levels protect the musculoskeletal system but are associated with elevated oxidative stress markers and increased mortality independent of tissue igf1 gene expression. / Elis, Sebastien; Wu, Yingjie; Courtland, Hayden William; Sun, Hui (Herb); Rosen, Clifford J.; Adamo, Martin L.; Yakar, Shoshana.

In: Aging Cell, Vol. 10, No. 3, 06.2011, p. 547-550.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Elis, Sebastien ; Wu, Yingjie ; Courtland, Hayden William ; Sun, Hui (Herb) ; Rosen, Clifford J. ; Adamo, Martin L. ; Yakar, Shoshana. / Increased serum IGF-1 levels protect the musculoskeletal system but are associated with elevated oxidative stress markers and increased mortality independent of tissue igf1 gene expression. In: Aging Cell. 2011 ; Vol. 10, No. 3. pp. 547-550.
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