Increased prevalence of obesity and obesity-related postoperative complications in male patients with meningiomas

Manish K. Aghi, Emad N. Eskandar, Bob S. Carter, William T. Curry, Fred G. Barker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The female preponderance of meningiomas may reflect hormonal influences on meningioma growth. We hypothesized that because obesity affects male steroid hormone synthesis, male patients with meningiomas might exhibit a high obesity rate, which, in turn, might increase their frequency of postoperative complications. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed male patients who underwent craniotomy for benign meningiomas at our institution between 2001 and 2005 (n = 32) and used male patients undergoing craniotomy for aneurysms (n = 32) or glioblastomas (n = 32) from 2001 to 2005 as control subjects. Body mass index (BMI) greater than 30 kg/m was considered obese. RESULTS: Male patients with meningiomas had a higher average BMI (30.2 kg/m) than male patients with aneurysms (BMI = 27.5 kg/m) or gliomas (BMI = 25.9 kg/m) (P = 0.04). The obesity rate in men with meningiomas (47%) exceeded that in men with aneurysms (19%) or gliomas (3%) (P = 0.2). The median age-normalized BMI percentile was greater in men with meningiomas (67th percentile) than in men with aneurysms (49th percentile) or gliomas (52nd percentile) (P = 0.02). Deep vein thrombosis/pulmonary embolus was more common in men with meningiomas (19%) than in men with aneurysms (0%) or gliomas (3%) (P = 0.002). Wound infections were more common in men with meningiomas (6%) than in men with aneurysms (3%) or gliomas (0%) (P = 0.2). The 53% of obese patients with meningiomas who were readmitted with postoperative complications exceeded the 18% of nonobese patients with meningiomas who were readmitted (P = 0.03); complications included deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolus (27 and 12%, respectively, in obese and nonobese patients with meningiomas) and postoperative fever (53 and 35%, respectively, in obese and nonobese patients with meningiomas). CONCLUSION: We found that many men with meningiomas are obese, suggesting a hormonal influence on meningiomas in men as well as women. Our results also underscore the high risk of postoperative complications in obese male patients with meningiomas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)754-760
Number of pages7
JournalNeurosurgery
Volume61
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Estrogen
  • Male
  • Meningioma
  • Obesity
  • Postoperative complications

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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