In vivo, noninvasive functional measurements of bone sarcoma using diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging

Hannah M. Peterson, Bang H. Hoang, David Geller, Rui Yang, Richard Gorlick, Jeremy Berger, Janet Tingling, Michael Roth, Jonathon Gill, Darren Roblyer

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Abstract

Diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI) is an emerging near-infrared imaging technique that noninvasively measures quantitative functional information in thick tissue. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of using DOSI to measure optical contrast from bone sarcomas. These tumors are rare and pose technical and practical challenges for DOSI measurements due to the varied anatomic locations and tissue depths of presentation. Six subjects were enrolled in the study. One subject was unable to be measured due to tissue contact sensitivity. For the five remaining subjects, the signal-to-noise ratio, imaging depth, optical properties, and quantitative tissue concentrations of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, water, and lipids from tumor and contralateral normal tissues were assessed. Statistical differences between tumor and contralateral normal tissue were found in chromophore concentrations and optical properties for four subjects. Low signal-tonoise was encountered during several subjects measurements, suggesting increased detector sensitivity will help to optimize DOSI for this patient population going forward. This study demonstrates that DOSI is capable of measuring optical properties and obtaining functional information in bone sarcomas. In the future, DOSI may provide a means to stratify treatment groups and monitor chemotherapy response for this disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number121612
JournalJournal of Biomedical Optics
Volume22
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2017

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Keywords

  • diffuse optics
  • in vivo imaging
  • near-infrared
  • therapeutic monitoring
  • tissue spectroscopy
  • translational research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Biomedical Engineering

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