In vitro-selected RNA cleaving DNA enzymes from a combinatorial library are potent inhibitors of HIV-1 gene expression

B. Sriram, A. C. Banerjea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Selective inactivation of a target gene by antisense mechanisms is an important biological tool to delineate specific functions of the gene product. Approaches mediated by ribozymes and RNA-cleaving DNA enzymes (DNA enzymes) are more attractive because of their ability to catalytically cleave the target RNA. DNA enzymes have recently gained a lot of importance because they are short DNA molecules with simple structures that are expected to be stable to the nucleases present inside a mammalian cell. We have designed a strategy to identify accessible cleavage sites in HIV-1 gag RNA from a pool of random DNA enzymes, and for isolation of DNA enzymes. A pool of random sequences (all 29 nucleotides long) that contained the earlier-identified 10-23 catalytic motif were tested for their ability to cleave the target RNA. When the pool of random DNA enzymes was targeted to cleave between any A and U nucleotides, DNA enzyme 1836 was identified. Although several DNA enzymes were identified using a pool of DNA enzymes that was completely randomized with respect to its substrate-binding properties, DNA enzyme-1810 was selected for further characterization. Both DNA enzymes showed target-specific cleavage activities in the presence of Mg2+ only. When introduced into a mammalian cell, they showed interference with HIV-1-specific gene expression. This strategy could be applied for the selection of desired target sites in any target RNA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)667-673
Number of pages7
JournalBiochemical Journal
Volume352
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gene expression
HIV-1
RNA
Gene Expression
DNA
Enzymes
In Vitro Techniques
Nucleotides
Genes
Cells
Catalytic RNA
Molecules

Keywords

  • HIV-1 gag
  • HIV-1 replication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

In vitro-selected RNA cleaving DNA enzymes from a combinatorial library are potent inhibitors of HIV-1 gene expression. / Sriram, B.; Banerjea, A. C.

In: Biochemical Journal, Vol. 352, No. 3, 15.12.2000, p. 667-673.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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