Improved Survival and Cure Rates with Concurrent Treatment for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Coinfection in South Africa

James C.M. Brust, N. Sarita Shah, Koleka Mlisana, Pravi Moodley, Salim Allana, Angela Campbell, Brent A. Johnson, Iqbal Master, Thuli Mthiyane, Simlatha Lachman, Lee Megan Larkan, Yuming Ning, Amyn Malik, Jonathan P. Smith, Neel R. Gandhi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Mortality in multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection has historically been high, but most studies predated the availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART). We prospectively compared survival and treatment outcomes in MDR tuberculosis-HIV-coinfected patients on ART to those in patients with MDR tuberculosis alone. Methods This observational study enrolled culture-confirmed MDR tuberculosis patients with and without HIV in South Africa between 2011 and 2013. Participants received standardized MDR tuberculosis and HIV regimens and were followed monthly for treatment response, adverse events, and adherence. The primary outcome was survival. Results Among 206 participants, 150 were HIV infected, 131 (64%) were female, and the median age was 33 years (interquartile range [IQR], 26-41). Of the 191 participants with a final MDR tuberculosis outcome, 130 (73%) were cured or completed treatment, which did not differ by HIV status (P =.50). After 2 years, CD4 count increased a median of 140 cells/mm 3 (P =.005), and 64% had an undetectable HIV viral load. HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected participants had high rates of survival (86% and 94%, respectively; P =.34). The strongest risk factor for mortality was having a CD4 count ≤100 cells/mm 3 (adjusted hazards ratio, 15.6; 95% confidence interval, 4.4-55.6). Conclusions Survival and treatment outcomes among MDR tuberculosis-HIV individuals receiving concurrent ART approached those of HIV-uninfected patients. The greatest risk of death was among HIV-infected individuals with CD4 counts ≤100 cells/mm 3. These findings provide critical evidence to support concurrent treatment of MDR tuberculosis and HIV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1246-1253
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume66
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2018

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Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis
South Africa
Coinfection
Survival Rate
HIV
Therapeutics
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Survival
Mortality
Viral Load
Observational Studies

Keywords

  • drug resistance
  • HIV
  • outcomes
  • treatment
  • tuberculosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Improved Survival and Cure Rates with Concurrent Treatment for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Coinfection in South Africa. / Brust, James C.M.; Shah, N. Sarita; Mlisana, Koleka; Moodley, Pravi; Allana, Salim; Campbell, Angela; Johnson, Brent A.; Master, Iqbal; Mthiyane, Thuli; Lachman, Simlatha; Larkan, Lee Megan; Ning, Yuming; Malik, Amyn; Smith, Jonathan P.; Gandhi, Neel R.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 66, No. 8, 03.04.2018, p. 1246-1253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brust, JCM, Shah, NS, Mlisana, K, Moodley, P, Allana, S, Campbell, A, Johnson, BA, Master, I, Mthiyane, T, Lachman, S, Larkan, LM, Ning, Y, Malik, A, Smith, JP & Gandhi, NR 2018, 'Improved Survival and Cure Rates with Concurrent Treatment for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Coinfection in South Africa', Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 66, no. 8, pp. 1246-1253. https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/cix1125
Brust, James C.M. ; Shah, N. Sarita ; Mlisana, Koleka ; Moodley, Pravi ; Allana, Salim ; Campbell, Angela ; Johnson, Brent A. ; Master, Iqbal ; Mthiyane, Thuli ; Lachman, Simlatha ; Larkan, Lee Megan ; Ning, Yuming ; Malik, Amyn ; Smith, Jonathan P. ; Gandhi, Neel R. / Improved Survival and Cure Rates with Concurrent Treatment for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Coinfection in South Africa. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2018 ; Vol. 66, No. 8. pp. 1246-1253.
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abstract = "Background Mortality in multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection has historically been high, but most studies predated the availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART). We prospectively compared survival and treatment outcomes in MDR tuberculosis-HIV-coinfected patients on ART to those in patients with MDR tuberculosis alone. Methods This observational study enrolled culture-confirmed MDR tuberculosis patients with and without HIV in South Africa between 2011 and 2013. Participants received standardized MDR tuberculosis and HIV regimens and were followed monthly for treatment response, adverse events, and adherence. The primary outcome was survival. Results Among 206 participants, 150 were HIV infected, 131 (64{\%}) were female, and the median age was 33 years (interquartile range [IQR], 26-41). Of the 191 participants with a final MDR tuberculosis outcome, 130 (73{\%}) were cured or completed treatment, which did not differ by HIV status (P =.50). After 2 years, CD4 count increased a median of 140 cells/mm 3 (P =.005), and 64{\%} had an undetectable HIV viral load. HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected participants had high rates of survival (86{\%} and 94{\%}, respectively; P =.34). The strongest risk factor for mortality was having a CD4 count ≤100 cells/mm 3 (adjusted hazards ratio, 15.6; 95{\%} confidence interval, 4.4-55.6). Conclusions Survival and treatment outcomes among MDR tuberculosis-HIV individuals receiving concurrent ART approached those of HIV-uninfected patients. The greatest risk of death was among HIV-infected individuals with CD4 counts ≤100 cells/mm 3. These findings provide critical evidence to support concurrent treatment of MDR tuberculosis and HIV.",
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AU - Lachman, Simlatha

AU - Larkan, Lee Megan

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AU - Smith, Jonathan P.

AU - Gandhi, Neel R.

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N2 - Background Mortality in multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection has historically been high, but most studies predated the availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART). We prospectively compared survival and treatment outcomes in MDR tuberculosis-HIV-coinfected patients on ART to those in patients with MDR tuberculosis alone. Methods This observational study enrolled culture-confirmed MDR tuberculosis patients with and without HIV in South Africa between 2011 and 2013. Participants received standardized MDR tuberculosis and HIV regimens and were followed monthly for treatment response, adverse events, and adherence. The primary outcome was survival. Results Among 206 participants, 150 were HIV infected, 131 (64%) were female, and the median age was 33 years (interquartile range [IQR], 26-41). Of the 191 participants with a final MDR tuberculosis outcome, 130 (73%) were cured or completed treatment, which did not differ by HIV status (P =.50). After 2 years, CD4 count increased a median of 140 cells/mm 3 (P =.005), and 64% had an undetectable HIV viral load. HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected participants had high rates of survival (86% and 94%, respectively; P =.34). The strongest risk factor for mortality was having a CD4 count ≤100 cells/mm 3 (adjusted hazards ratio, 15.6; 95% confidence interval, 4.4-55.6). Conclusions Survival and treatment outcomes among MDR tuberculosis-HIV individuals receiving concurrent ART approached those of HIV-uninfected patients. The greatest risk of death was among HIV-infected individuals with CD4 counts ≤100 cells/mm 3. These findings provide critical evidence to support concurrent treatment of MDR tuberculosis and HIV.

AB - Background Mortality in multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection has historically been high, but most studies predated the availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART). We prospectively compared survival and treatment outcomes in MDR tuberculosis-HIV-coinfected patients on ART to those in patients with MDR tuberculosis alone. Methods This observational study enrolled culture-confirmed MDR tuberculosis patients with and without HIV in South Africa between 2011 and 2013. Participants received standardized MDR tuberculosis and HIV regimens and were followed monthly for treatment response, adverse events, and adherence. The primary outcome was survival. Results Among 206 participants, 150 were HIV infected, 131 (64%) were female, and the median age was 33 years (interquartile range [IQR], 26-41). Of the 191 participants with a final MDR tuberculosis outcome, 130 (73%) were cured or completed treatment, which did not differ by HIV status (P =.50). After 2 years, CD4 count increased a median of 140 cells/mm 3 (P =.005), and 64% had an undetectable HIV viral load. HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected participants had high rates of survival (86% and 94%, respectively; P =.34). The strongest risk factor for mortality was having a CD4 count ≤100 cells/mm 3 (adjusted hazards ratio, 15.6; 95% confidence interval, 4.4-55.6). Conclusions Survival and treatment outcomes among MDR tuberculosis-HIV individuals receiving concurrent ART approached those of HIV-uninfected patients. The greatest risk of death was among HIV-infected individuals with CD4 counts ≤100 cells/mm 3. These findings provide critical evidence to support concurrent treatment of MDR tuberculosis and HIV.

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