Improved power by use of a weighted score test for linkage disequilibrium mapping

Tao Wang, Robert C. Elston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Association studies offer an exciting approach to finding underlying genetic variants of complex human diseases. However, identification of genetic variants still includes difficult challenges, and it is important to develop powerful new statistical methods. Currently, association methods may depend on single-locus analysis-that is, analysis of the association of one locus, which is typically a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), at a time-or on multilocus analysis, in which multiple SNPs are used to allow extraction of maximum information about linkage disequilibrium (LD). It has been shown that single-locus analysis may have low power because a single SNP often has limited LD information. Multilocus analysis, which is more informative, can be performed on the basis of either haplotypes or genotypes. It may lose power because of the often large number of degrees of freedom involved. The ideal method must make full use of important information from multiple loci but avoid increasing the degrees of freedom. Therefore, we propose a method to capture information from multiple SNPs but with the use of fewer degrees of freedom. When a set of SNPs in a block are correlated because of LD, we might expect that the genotype variation among the different phenotypic groups would extend across all the SNPs, and this information could be compressed into the low-frequency components of a Fourier transform. Therefore, we develop a test based on weighted Fourier transformation coefficients, with more weight given to the low-frequency components. Our simulation results demonstrate the validity and substantially higher power of the proposed method compared with other common methods. This method provides an additional tool to existing methods for identification of causative genetic variants underlying complex diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)353-360
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Human Genetics
Volume80
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Chromosome Mapping
Linkage Disequilibrium
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Genotype
Information Storage and Retrieval
Fourier Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Haplotypes
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

Cite this

Improved power by use of a weighted score test for linkage disequilibrium mapping. / Wang, Tao; Elston, Robert C.

In: American Journal of Human Genetics, Vol. 80, No. 2, 02.2007, p. 353-360.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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