Impediment profiling for smoking cessation: Results of a pilot study

Meghan O'Connell, Sean C. Lucan, Ming Chin Yeh, Elaine Rodriguez, Dipti Shah, Wendy Chan, David L. Katz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To test the effectiveness of a smoking cessation program based on "impediment profiling," the elucidation of an individual participant's personal barriers, with provision of tailored interventions accordingly. Methods. A literature search was conducted to identify established impediments to smoking cessation. A long impediment profiler (LIP) was developed from validated survey instruments and used as a screening tool to identify individuals' barriers to quitting. Once barriers were identified, participants were assigned to up to seven interventions. Self-reported smoking cessation was confirmed with measurements of carbon monoxide concentrations in expired air of ≤ 10 ppm. Results. Nineteen adults participated in the pilot program. At the year 1 mark, 63.2% of the study population was smoke-free. The mean number of impediments of the study population was 3.5 ± 1.5. There was a negative association between subjects' quit status and the following impediments: stress (p = .0061), anxiety (p = .0445), and depression (p < .001). No single impediment was predictive of quit status. Conclusions. Impediment profiling as a basis for tailored smoking cessation intervention is associated with a high quit rate in this initial study, and it appears promising. Long-term follow-up is warranted, as is replication in a larger cohort with a concurrent control group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)300-303
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Promotion
Volume17
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Smoking Cessation
smoking
Carbon Monoxide
Smoke
Population
Anxiety
Air
air
Depression
anxiety
Control Groups
Group

Keywords

  • Intervention Study
  • Prevention Research
  • Smoke
  • Smoking
  • Smoking Cessation
  • Tobacco
  • Tobacco Use Cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

O'Connell, M., Lucan, S. C., Yeh, M. C., Rodriguez, E., Shah, D., Chan, W., & Katz, D. L. (2003). Impediment profiling for smoking cessation: Results of a pilot study. American Journal of Health Promotion, 17(5), 300-303.

Impediment profiling for smoking cessation : Results of a pilot study. / O'Connell, Meghan; Lucan, Sean C.; Yeh, Ming Chin; Rodriguez, Elaine; Shah, Dipti; Chan, Wendy; Katz, David L.

In: American Journal of Health Promotion, Vol. 17, No. 5, 05.2003, p. 300-303.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

O'Connell, M, Lucan, SC, Yeh, MC, Rodriguez, E, Shah, D, Chan, W & Katz, DL 2003, 'Impediment profiling for smoking cessation: Results of a pilot study', American Journal of Health Promotion, vol. 17, no. 5, pp. 300-303.
O'Connell M, Lucan SC, Yeh MC, Rodriguez E, Shah D, Chan W et al. Impediment profiling for smoking cessation: Results of a pilot study. American Journal of Health Promotion. 2003 May;17(5):300-303.
O'Connell, Meghan ; Lucan, Sean C. ; Yeh, Ming Chin ; Rodriguez, Elaine ; Shah, Dipti ; Chan, Wendy ; Katz, David L. / Impediment profiling for smoking cessation : Results of a pilot study. In: American Journal of Health Promotion. 2003 ; Vol. 17, No. 5. pp. 300-303.
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