Impact of partial volume effects on visceral adipose tissue quantification using MRI

Anqi Zhou, Horacio Murillo, Qi Peng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To quantitatively estimate the impact of partial volume effects on visceral adipose tissue (VAT) quantification using typical resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods: Nine normal or overweight subjects were scanned at central abdomen levels with a water-saturated, balanced steady-state free precession (b-SSFP) sequence. The water-saturation effectiveness was evaluated with region-of-interest analysis on fat, muscle, bowel, and noise areas. The number of full-volume (FV) and partial-volume (PV) fat pixels was estimated based on a gray-level histogram model of water-saturated images. Both FV and PV fat amounts were quantified. Results: High-quality, fat-only images were generated with the b-SSFP imaging method. Fat SNR was 77.7 ± 25.6 and water-saturation was effective, with the average fat-to-water signal intensity ratio = 20.7 ± 3.8. The average ratio of partial- to full-volume fat amounts was 104.0%. The ratio was higher with lower body mass index (BMI) and PV fat amount only increased slightly when BMI increased. Conclusion: PV fat contributes a significant amount of fat to fat measurements on typical spatial resolution MRI on normal and overweight subjects. The relative PV fat contribution is markedly higher in slimmer patients. Inclusion of this portion of the adipose tissue will increase overall accuracy and decrease variability of VAT quantification using MRI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1452-1457
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

Keywords

  • abdominal MRI
  • body composition
  • obesity
  • partial volume effects
  • visceral adipose tissue

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Impact of partial volume effects on visceral adipose tissue quantification using MRI'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this