Impact of an inner-city, hospital-based preterm prevention program on preterm births in twin gestation.

C. F. Edwards, C. Chazotte, M. C. Freda, L. Shah, B. Girz, K. Damus, Irwin R. Merkatz

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the impact of an inner-city, hospital-based preterm-birth prevention program on the outcome of twin pregnancies. A retrospective study of delivery outcomes from 1985 to 1992 of eligible consecutive twin deliveries that were > or = 20 weeks' gestation compared two inner-city hospitals in the Bronx, New York: one with a preterm prevention program for twin births and a comparable site offering conventional prenatal care. A group of patients receiving no prenatal care was also included. Outcomes were evaluated by prenatal-care site, except for those who received no prenatal care and delivered at either site. Data were analyzed by chi-square analysis and analysis of variance. Of the 377 twin pregnancies, 330 pregnancies were eligible deliveries. One hundred thirty-four women received prenatal care from the preterm prevention program, 161 received conventional prenatal care at a comparable site, and 35 received no prenatal care. Maternal age, parity, and mode of delivery were similar in the two delivery sites. There was an increased incidence of complications in the no-prenatal-care group compared with the groups who received the preterm prevention or conventional prenatal care. The percentage of low-birth-weight (< 2500 g) and very-low-birth-weight (< 1000 g) infants was similar in the preterm prevention and the conventional care groups. The percentage of extremely low-birth-weight (< 1000 g) infants was significantly lower in twin births of the preterm prevention site (9.7%) and the conventional site (11.3%) compared with the no-prenatal-care group (28.6%) (P < .01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)78-81
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the Association for Academic Minority Physicians : the official publication of the Association for Academic Minority Physicians
Volume6
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1995

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Prenatal Care
Urban Hospitals
Premature Birth
Pregnancy
Twin Pregnancy
Low Birth Weight Infant
Very Low Birth Weight Infant
Maternal Age
Parity
Analysis of Variance
Retrospective Studies
Parturition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Impact of an inner-city, hospital-based preterm prevention program on preterm births in twin gestation.",
abstract = "The objective of this study was to determine the impact of an inner-city, hospital-based preterm-birth prevention program on the outcome of twin pregnancies. A retrospective study of delivery outcomes from 1985 to 1992 of eligible consecutive twin deliveries that were > or = 20 weeks' gestation compared two inner-city hospitals in the Bronx, New York: one with a preterm prevention program for twin births and a comparable site offering conventional prenatal care. A group of patients receiving no prenatal care was also included. Outcomes were evaluated by prenatal-care site, except for those who received no prenatal care and delivered at either site. Data were analyzed by chi-square analysis and analysis of variance. Of the 377 twin pregnancies, 330 pregnancies were eligible deliveries. One hundred thirty-four women received prenatal care from the preterm prevention program, 161 received conventional prenatal care at a comparable site, and 35 received no prenatal care. Maternal age, parity, and mode of delivery were similar in the two delivery sites. There was an increased incidence of complications in the no-prenatal-care group compared with the groups who received the preterm prevention or conventional prenatal care. The percentage of low-birth-weight (< 2500 g) and very-low-birth-weight (< 1000 g) infants was similar in the preterm prevention and the conventional care groups. The percentage of extremely low-birth-weight (< 1000 g) infants was significantly lower in twin births of the preterm prevention site (9.7{\%}) and the conventional site (11.3{\%}) compared with the no-prenatal-care group (28.6{\%}) (P < .01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)",
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T1 - Impact of an inner-city, hospital-based preterm prevention program on preterm births in twin gestation.

AU - Edwards, C. F.

AU - Chazotte, C.

AU - Freda, M. C.

AU - Shah, L.

AU - Girz, B.

AU - Damus, K.

AU - Merkatz, Irwin R.

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N2 - The objective of this study was to determine the impact of an inner-city, hospital-based preterm-birth prevention program on the outcome of twin pregnancies. A retrospective study of delivery outcomes from 1985 to 1992 of eligible consecutive twin deliveries that were > or = 20 weeks' gestation compared two inner-city hospitals in the Bronx, New York: one with a preterm prevention program for twin births and a comparable site offering conventional prenatal care. A group of patients receiving no prenatal care was also included. Outcomes were evaluated by prenatal-care site, except for those who received no prenatal care and delivered at either site. Data were analyzed by chi-square analysis and analysis of variance. Of the 377 twin pregnancies, 330 pregnancies were eligible deliveries. One hundred thirty-four women received prenatal care from the preterm prevention program, 161 received conventional prenatal care at a comparable site, and 35 received no prenatal care. Maternal age, parity, and mode of delivery were similar in the two delivery sites. There was an increased incidence of complications in the no-prenatal-care group compared with the groups who received the preterm prevention or conventional prenatal care. The percentage of low-birth-weight (< 2500 g) and very-low-birth-weight (< 1000 g) infants was similar in the preterm prevention and the conventional care groups. The percentage of extremely low-birth-weight (< 1000 g) infants was significantly lower in twin births of the preterm prevention site (9.7%) and the conventional site (11.3%) compared with the no-prenatal-care group (28.6%) (P < .01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

AB - The objective of this study was to determine the impact of an inner-city, hospital-based preterm-birth prevention program on the outcome of twin pregnancies. A retrospective study of delivery outcomes from 1985 to 1992 of eligible consecutive twin deliveries that were > or = 20 weeks' gestation compared two inner-city hospitals in the Bronx, New York: one with a preterm prevention program for twin births and a comparable site offering conventional prenatal care. A group of patients receiving no prenatal care was also included. Outcomes were evaluated by prenatal-care site, except for those who received no prenatal care and delivered at either site. Data were analyzed by chi-square analysis and analysis of variance. Of the 377 twin pregnancies, 330 pregnancies were eligible deliveries. One hundred thirty-four women received prenatal care from the preterm prevention program, 161 received conventional prenatal care at a comparable site, and 35 received no prenatal care. Maternal age, parity, and mode of delivery were similar in the two delivery sites. There was an increased incidence of complications in the no-prenatal-care group compared with the groups who received the preterm prevention or conventional prenatal care. The percentage of low-birth-weight (< 2500 g) and very-low-birth-weight (< 1000 g) infants was similar in the preterm prevention and the conventional care groups. The percentage of extremely low-birth-weight (< 1000 g) infants was significantly lower in twin births of the preterm prevention site (9.7%) and the conventional site (11.3%) compared with the no-prenatal-care group (28.6%) (P < .01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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