Immunological variation between inbred laboratory mouse strains

Points to consider in phenotyping genetically immunomodified mice

R. S. Sellers, C. B. Clifford, P. M. Treuting, C. Brayton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

97 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inbred laboratory mouse strains are highly divergent in their immune response patterns as a result of genetic mutations and polymorphisms. The generation of genetically engineered mice (GEM) has, in the past, used embryonic stem (ES) cells for gene targeting from various 129 substrains followed by backcrossing into more fecund mouse strains. Although common inbred mice are considered "immune competent," many have variations in their immune system-some of which have been described-that may affect the phenotype. Recognition of these immune variations among commonly used inbred mouse strains is essential for the accurate interpretation of expected phenotypes or those that may arise unexpectedly. In GEM developed to study specific components of the immune system, accurate evaluation of immune responses must take into consideration not only the gene of interest but also how the background strain and microbial milieu contribute to the manifestation of findings in these mice. This article discusses points to consider regarding immunological differences between the common inbred laboratory mouse strains, particularly in their use as background strains in GEM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-43
Number of pages12
JournalVeterinary Pathology
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

Fingerprint

Inbred Strains Mice
phenotype
mice
Immune System
immune system
genetically engineered microorganisms
Phenotype
immune response
Inbreeding
Gene Targeting
Embryonic Stem Cells
backcrossing
embryonic stem cells
gene targeting
genetic polymorphism
Mutation
mutation

Keywords

  • acquired immunity
  • GEM
  • genetic engineering
  • immunodeficiency
  • immunophenotype
  • inbred mice
  • innate immunity
  • pathogens
  • phenotype
  • scid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Immunological variation between inbred laboratory mouse strains : Points to consider in phenotyping genetically immunomodified mice. / Sellers, R. S.; Clifford, C. B.; Treuting, P. M.; Brayton, C.

In: Veterinary Pathology, Vol. 49, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 32-43.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sellers, R. S. ; Clifford, C. B. ; Treuting, P. M. ; Brayton, C. / Immunological variation between inbred laboratory mouse strains : Points to consider in phenotyping genetically immunomodified mice. In: Veterinary Pathology. 2012 ; Vol. 49, No. 1. pp. 32-43.
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