Immunologic Targets of HIV Infection: T Cells

THE NICHD IVIG CLINICAL TRIAL GROUP, THE NHLBI P2C2 PEDIATRIC PULMONARY AND CARDIAC COMPLICATIONS OF HIV INFECTION STUDY GROUP

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One of the principal targets of HIV infection is the human peripheral blood CD4+ T cell, resulting in progressive CD4+ lymphocyte loss. Hypothesized mechanisms for this loss include apoptosis, cytolytic reactions, V-p gene deletion of the T-cell receptor (TCR) by superantigens, CD4+ lymphocyte syncytium formation, and autoimmune reactions. In adults with HIV infection, the critical decline in CD4+ lymphocyte number that heralds the onset of AIDS-defining conditions is well characterized, whereas in infants and children the critical level of CD4+ cells predisposing to the development of AIDS-defining conditions or mortality is not fully characterized, due to an incomplete knowledge of CD4+ lymphocyte number and changes with age in normal and HIV-infected children. In a prospective study of 317 infants born to HIV-infected women, early results show that the monthly change in absolute CD4+ lymphocyte number over a 3- to 9-month period in HIV-infected infants was - 109 cells/mm3 per month, at least double the rate of decline measured in HIV-noninfected infants in the study or that calculated from normal infants' values reported in the literature. In other clinical studies in HIV-infected infants and children, it was possible to study the effect of low CD4+ cell counts on clinical status and mortality. In HIV-infected pediatric patients younger than 1 year, it was possible to correlate low CD4+ cell number with advanced disease status (CDC pediatric class P-2). It was also possible to correlate extremely low CD4+ cell counts (<200 cells/mm3) in HIV-infected children with a significant risk of mortality within the next 3 months of life. Sequential CD4+ cell analysis of HlV-high-risk infants will delineate the rate of HIV-related decline in CD4+ cells, thus facilitating the diagnosis of HIV infection and aiding in identification of HIV-infected children at high risk of disease progression or death.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-51
Number of pages17
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume693
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1993

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T-cells
Lymphocytes
HIV Infections
HIV
T-Lymphocytes
Pediatrics
Lymphocyte Count
Superantigens
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Mortality
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Blood
Genes
AIDS/HIV
Cells
Infection
Apoptosis
Gene Deletion
Giant Cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

THE NICHD IVIG CLINICAL TRIAL GROUP, & THE NHLBI P2C2 PEDIATRIC PULMONARY AND CARDIAC COMPLICATIONS OF HIV INFECTION STUDY GROUP (1993). Immunologic Targets of HIV Infection: T Cells. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 693(1), 35-51. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.1993.tb26255.x

Immunologic Targets of HIV Infection : T Cells. / THE NICHD IVIG CLINICAL TRIAL GROUP; THE NHLBI P2C2 PEDIATRIC PULMONARY AND CARDIAC COMPLICATIONS OF HIV INFECTION STUDY GROUP.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 693, No. 1, 01.10.1993, p. 35-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

THE NICHD IVIG CLINICAL TRIAL GROUP & THE NHLBI P2C2 PEDIATRIC PULMONARY AND CARDIAC COMPLICATIONS OF HIV INFECTION STUDY GROUP 1993, 'Immunologic Targets of HIV Infection: T Cells', Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 693, no. 1, pp. 35-51. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.1993.tb26255.x
THE NICHD IVIG CLINICAL TRIAL GROUP, THE NHLBI P2C2 PEDIATRIC PULMONARY AND CARDIAC COMPLICATIONS OF HIV INFECTION STUDY GROUP. Immunologic Targets of HIV Infection: T Cells. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 1993 Oct 1;693(1):35-51. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.1993.tb26255.x
THE NICHD IVIG CLINICAL TRIAL GROUP ; THE NHLBI P2C2 PEDIATRIC PULMONARY AND CARDIAC COMPLICATIONS OF HIV INFECTION STUDY GROUP. / Immunologic Targets of HIV Infection : T Cells. In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 1993 ; Vol. 693, No. 1. pp. 35-51.
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