Imaging for transcatheter native tricuspid valve intervention: patient selection, procedural planning and interventional guidance

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

There are an increasing number of transcatheter tricuspid valve interventions being performed worldwide using commercially available and investigational devices. Imaging in the pre-procedural and periprocedural period is essential for procedural and clinical success. Echocardiographic-based techniques are particularly important in these procedures, especially for interventional guidance. This review summarizes the current devices in use and how imaging is used for patient selection, procedural planning, and interventional guidance. The most commonly used method of transcatheter tricuspid intervention is edge-to-edge repair using the MitraClip or TriClip devices (Abbott, Santa Clara, CA, USA). Randomized controlled data is pending but observational studies have demonstrated success, especially in the setting of smaller coaptation gaps and adequate transesophageal imaging windows. Direct annuloplasty with the Cardioband (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) has also been used in many centers and has demonstrated success when the anatomy and mechanism of tricuspid regurgitation are appropriate for annuloplasty based on imaging evaluation. Lastly, transcatheter valve replacement is becoming more common using several investigational devices and relies heavily on imaging methods to achieve procedural success.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)707-719
Number of pages13
JournalMinerva Cardiology and Angiology
Volume69
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • Echocardiography
  • Transcatheter aortic valve replacement
  • Tricuspid valve insufficiency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

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