Iatrogenic Ventricular Septal Defect Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

A systematic review

Tomo Ando, Anthony A. Holmes, Cynthia C. Taub, David P. Slovut, Joseph DeRose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Ventricular septal defects (VSD) are rarely reported as a complication following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We sought to characterise the patients, clinical management, and outcomes regarding this rare phenomenon. Methods: Relevant articles were identified by a systematic search of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from January, 2002 to September, 2015. Results: A total of 18 studies, including 20 patients, were identified. The median age was 83 years and six were male. Twelve were performed by trans-femoral approach. Pre-dilation was performed in 12 patients and post-dilation in four. Balloon expandable valves were used in the majority (85%) of cases. The clinical presentation varied from asymptomatic to progressive heart failure. The timing of the diagnosis also varied significantly from immediately post valve implantation to one year afterwards. There were two cases of Gerbode-type defect while the rest were inter-ventricular defects. The location was mostly membranous or perimenbranous (79%) and adjacent to the valve landing zone. A total of seven interventions (one open surgery and six percutaneous closure) were performed. Four patients died during the same hospital admission. Sixteen survived past discharge (range 12 days to two years). Conclusions: Ventricular septal defects post-TAVR were seen more with balloon expandable valves and with pre-dilation or post-dilation. Percutaneous treatment of the VSD was preferred over open cardiac surgery given the high surgical risk in this patient population. Some, but not all, patients survived TAVR and VSD and had a good prognosis for both patient groups with or without VSD closure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHeart Lung and Circulation
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 27 2016

Fingerprint

Ventricular Heart Septal Defects
Dilatation
Thigh
Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement
MEDLINE
Thoracic Surgery
Heart Failure
Databases
Population

Keywords

  • Aortic stenosis
  • Transcatheter aortic valve replacement
  • Ventricular septal defect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

@article{79b770f9147e4353aa6b41b160f0ff6f,
title = "Iatrogenic Ventricular Septal Defect Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: A systematic review",
abstract = "Background: Ventricular septal defects (VSD) are rarely reported as a complication following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We sought to characterise the patients, clinical management, and outcomes regarding this rare phenomenon. Methods: Relevant articles were identified by a systematic search of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from January, 2002 to September, 2015. Results: A total of 18 studies, including 20 patients, were identified. The median age was 83 years and six were male. Twelve were performed by trans-femoral approach. Pre-dilation was performed in 12 patients and post-dilation in four. Balloon expandable valves were used in the majority (85{\%}) of cases. The clinical presentation varied from asymptomatic to progressive heart failure. The timing of the diagnosis also varied significantly from immediately post valve implantation to one year afterwards. There were two cases of Gerbode-type defect while the rest were inter-ventricular defects. The location was mostly membranous or perimenbranous (79{\%}) and adjacent to the valve landing zone. A total of seven interventions (one open surgery and six percutaneous closure) were performed. Four patients died during the same hospital admission. Sixteen survived past discharge (range 12 days to two years). Conclusions: Ventricular septal defects post-TAVR were seen more with balloon expandable valves and with pre-dilation or post-dilation. Percutaneous treatment of the VSD was preferred over open cardiac surgery given the high surgical risk in this patient population. Some, but not all, patients survived TAVR and VSD and had a good prognosis for both patient groups with or without VSD closure.",
keywords = "Aortic stenosis, Transcatheter aortic valve replacement, Ventricular septal defect",
author = "Tomo Ando and Holmes, {Anthony A.} and Taub, {Cynthia C.} and Slovut, {David P.} and Joseph DeRose",
year = "2016",
month = "2",
day = "27",
doi = "10.1016/j.hlc.2016.03.012",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Heart Lung and Circulation",
issn = "1443-9506",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Iatrogenic Ventricular Septal Defect Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

T2 - A systematic review

AU - Ando, Tomo

AU - Holmes, Anthony A.

AU - Taub, Cynthia C.

AU - Slovut, David P.

AU - DeRose, Joseph

PY - 2016/2/27

Y1 - 2016/2/27

N2 - Background: Ventricular septal defects (VSD) are rarely reported as a complication following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We sought to characterise the patients, clinical management, and outcomes regarding this rare phenomenon. Methods: Relevant articles were identified by a systematic search of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from January, 2002 to September, 2015. Results: A total of 18 studies, including 20 patients, were identified. The median age was 83 years and six were male. Twelve were performed by trans-femoral approach. Pre-dilation was performed in 12 patients and post-dilation in four. Balloon expandable valves were used in the majority (85%) of cases. The clinical presentation varied from asymptomatic to progressive heart failure. The timing of the diagnosis also varied significantly from immediately post valve implantation to one year afterwards. There were two cases of Gerbode-type defect while the rest were inter-ventricular defects. The location was mostly membranous or perimenbranous (79%) and adjacent to the valve landing zone. A total of seven interventions (one open surgery and six percutaneous closure) were performed. Four patients died during the same hospital admission. Sixteen survived past discharge (range 12 days to two years). Conclusions: Ventricular septal defects post-TAVR were seen more with balloon expandable valves and with pre-dilation or post-dilation. Percutaneous treatment of the VSD was preferred over open cardiac surgery given the high surgical risk in this patient population. Some, but not all, patients survived TAVR and VSD and had a good prognosis for both patient groups with or without VSD closure.

AB - Background: Ventricular septal defects (VSD) are rarely reported as a complication following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We sought to characterise the patients, clinical management, and outcomes regarding this rare phenomenon. Methods: Relevant articles were identified by a systematic search of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from January, 2002 to September, 2015. Results: A total of 18 studies, including 20 patients, were identified. The median age was 83 years and six were male. Twelve were performed by trans-femoral approach. Pre-dilation was performed in 12 patients and post-dilation in four. Balloon expandable valves were used in the majority (85%) of cases. The clinical presentation varied from asymptomatic to progressive heart failure. The timing of the diagnosis also varied significantly from immediately post valve implantation to one year afterwards. There were two cases of Gerbode-type defect while the rest were inter-ventricular defects. The location was mostly membranous or perimenbranous (79%) and adjacent to the valve landing zone. A total of seven interventions (one open surgery and six percutaneous closure) were performed. Four patients died during the same hospital admission. Sixteen survived past discharge (range 12 days to two years). Conclusions: Ventricular septal defects post-TAVR were seen more with balloon expandable valves and with pre-dilation or post-dilation. Percutaneous treatment of the VSD was preferred over open cardiac surgery given the high surgical risk in this patient population. Some, but not all, patients survived TAVR and VSD and had a good prognosis for both patient groups with or without VSD closure.

KW - Aortic stenosis

KW - Transcatheter aortic valve replacement

KW - Ventricular septal defect

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84964868576&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84964868576&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.hlc.2016.03.012

DO - 10.1016/j.hlc.2016.03.012

M3 - Article

JO - Heart Lung and Circulation

JF - Heart Lung and Circulation

SN - 1443-9506

ER -