Hypogastric artery coil embolization prior to endoluminal repair of aneurysms and fistulas: Buttock claudication, a recognized but possibly preventable complication

Jacob Cynamon, Daniel Lerer, Frank J. Veith, Benjamin H. Taragin, Samuel I. Wahl, Jeffrey L. Lautin, Takao Ohki, Seymour Sprayregen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

128 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: Hypogastric artery embolization is considered to be necessary to prevent retrograde flow and potential endoleaks when a stent-graft crosses the origin of the hypogastric artery. The authors assess the incidence of buttock claudication, which is the primary complication encountered. The effect of coil location and the presence of antegrade flow at the completion of embolization are evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Hypogastric artery embolization and endoluminal repair of aneurysms and fistulas was performed in 34 patients (30 men; four women) aged 27-91 years (mean, 76 years). Ten patients were being treated for solitary abdominal aortic aneurysms, 13 were being treated for aortoiliac aneurysms, and six patients were being treated for isolated common iliac aneurysms, three for hypogastric artery aneurysms and two for iliac arteriovenous fistulas. Eleven patients had coils placed completely above the bifurcation of the hypogastric artery and 23 patients had coils placed at the bifurcation, or within the branches of the hypogastric artery. Preservation of antegrade flow after embolization was noted in 14 of 34 patients. RESULTS: Thirty-four patients underwent stent- graft repair after hypogastric artery embolization. There were two perioperative deaths, three proximal leaks, and one collateral leak. Of the 32 patients who survived the procedure, there was one retrograde leak, even though 13 of 32 (41%) patients had continued antegrade flow at completion of the hypogastric artery embolization. When coils were placed at or in the bifurcation of the hypogastric artery, 12 of 22 (55%) experienced claudication. When coils were placed in the proximal hypogastric artery, one of 10 (10%) claudicated. CONCLUSION: It is probably not necessary to completely occlude antegrade flow in the hypogastric artery to prevent a distal endoleak. Buttock claudication is rare when coils are placed in the proximal hypogastric artery rather than at its bifurcation or in its branches.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)573-577
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology
Volume11
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 2000

Fingerprint

Buttocks
Angioplasty
Fistula
Aneurysm
Arteries
Iliac Aneurysm
Endoleak
Stents
Transplants
Arteriovenous Fistula
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

Keywords

  • Aneurysm, abdominal
  • Aneurysm, iliac
  • Hypogastric artery, occlusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Hypogastric artery coil embolization prior to endoluminal repair of aneurysms and fistulas : Buttock claudication, a recognized but possibly preventable complication. / Cynamon, Jacob; Lerer, Daniel; Veith, Frank J.; Taragin, Benjamin H.; Wahl, Samuel I.; Lautin, Jeffrey L.; Ohki, Takao; Sprayregen, Seymour.

In: Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Vol. 11, No. 5, 05.2000, p. 573-577.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "PURPOSE: Hypogastric artery embolization is considered to be necessary to prevent retrograde flow and potential endoleaks when a stent-graft crosses the origin of the hypogastric artery. The authors assess the incidence of buttock claudication, which is the primary complication encountered. The effect of coil location and the presence of antegrade flow at the completion of embolization are evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Hypogastric artery embolization and endoluminal repair of aneurysms and fistulas was performed in 34 patients (30 men; four women) aged 27-91 years (mean, 76 years). Ten patients were being treated for solitary abdominal aortic aneurysms, 13 were being treated for aortoiliac aneurysms, and six patients were being treated for isolated common iliac aneurysms, three for hypogastric artery aneurysms and two for iliac arteriovenous fistulas. Eleven patients had coils placed completely above the bifurcation of the hypogastric artery and 23 patients had coils placed at the bifurcation, or within the branches of the hypogastric artery. Preservation of antegrade flow after embolization was noted in 14 of 34 patients. RESULTS: Thirty-four patients underwent stent- graft repair after hypogastric artery embolization. There were two perioperative deaths, three proximal leaks, and one collateral leak. Of the 32 patients who survived the procedure, there was one retrograde leak, even though 13 of 32 (41{\%}) patients had continued antegrade flow at completion of the hypogastric artery embolization. When coils were placed at or in the bifurcation of the hypogastric artery, 12 of 22 (55{\%}) experienced claudication. When coils were placed in the proximal hypogastric artery, one of 10 (10{\%}) claudicated. CONCLUSION: It is probably not necessary to completely occlude antegrade flow in the hypogastric artery to prevent a distal endoleak. Buttock claudication is rare when coils are placed in the proximal hypogastric artery rather than at its bifurcation or in its branches.",
keywords = "Aneurysm, abdominal, Aneurysm, iliac, Hypogastric artery, occlusion",
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T1 - Hypogastric artery coil embolization prior to endoluminal repair of aneurysms and fistulas

T2 - Buttock claudication, a recognized but possibly preventable complication

AU - Cynamon, Jacob

AU - Lerer, Daniel

AU - Veith, Frank J.

AU - Taragin, Benjamin H.

AU - Wahl, Samuel I.

AU - Lautin, Jeffrey L.

AU - Ohki, Takao

AU - Sprayregen, Seymour

PY - 2000/5

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N2 - PURPOSE: Hypogastric artery embolization is considered to be necessary to prevent retrograde flow and potential endoleaks when a stent-graft crosses the origin of the hypogastric artery. The authors assess the incidence of buttock claudication, which is the primary complication encountered. The effect of coil location and the presence of antegrade flow at the completion of embolization are evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Hypogastric artery embolization and endoluminal repair of aneurysms and fistulas was performed in 34 patients (30 men; four women) aged 27-91 years (mean, 76 years). Ten patients were being treated for solitary abdominal aortic aneurysms, 13 were being treated for aortoiliac aneurysms, and six patients were being treated for isolated common iliac aneurysms, three for hypogastric artery aneurysms and two for iliac arteriovenous fistulas. Eleven patients had coils placed completely above the bifurcation of the hypogastric artery and 23 patients had coils placed at the bifurcation, or within the branches of the hypogastric artery. Preservation of antegrade flow after embolization was noted in 14 of 34 patients. RESULTS: Thirty-four patients underwent stent- graft repair after hypogastric artery embolization. There were two perioperative deaths, three proximal leaks, and one collateral leak. Of the 32 patients who survived the procedure, there was one retrograde leak, even though 13 of 32 (41%) patients had continued antegrade flow at completion of the hypogastric artery embolization. When coils were placed at or in the bifurcation of the hypogastric artery, 12 of 22 (55%) experienced claudication. When coils were placed in the proximal hypogastric artery, one of 10 (10%) claudicated. CONCLUSION: It is probably not necessary to completely occlude antegrade flow in the hypogastric artery to prevent a distal endoleak. Buttock claudication is rare when coils are placed in the proximal hypogastric artery rather than at its bifurcation or in its branches.

AB - PURPOSE: Hypogastric artery embolization is considered to be necessary to prevent retrograde flow and potential endoleaks when a stent-graft crosses the origin of the hypogastric artery. The authors assess the incidence of buttock claudication, which is the primary complication encountered. The effect of coil location and the presence of antegrade flow at the completion of embolization are evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Hypogastric artery embolization and endoluminal repair of aneurysms and fistulas was performed in 34 patients (30 men; four women) aged 27-91 years (mean, 76 years). Ten patients were being treated for solitary abdominal aortic aneurysms, 13 were being treated for aortoiliac aneurysms, and six patients were being treated for isolated common iliac aneurysms, three for hypogastric artery aneurysms and two for iliac arteriovenous fistulas. Eleven patients had coils placed completely above the bifurcation of the hypogastric artery and 23 patients had coils placed at the bifurcation, or within the branches of the hypogastric artery. Preservation of antegrade flow after embolization was noted in 14 of 34 patients. RESULTS: Thirty-four patients underwent stent- graft repair after hypogastric artery embolization. There were two perioperative deaths, three proximal leaks, and one collateral leak. Of the 32 patients who survived the procedure, there was one retrograde leak, even though 13 of 32 (41%) patients had continued antegrade flow at completion of the hypogastric artery embolization. When coils were placed at or in the bifurcation of the hypogastric artery, 12 of 22 (55%) experienced claudication. When coils were placed in the proximal hypogastric artery, one of 10 (10%) claudicated. CONCLUSION: It is probably not necessary to completely occlude antegrade flow in the hypogastric artery to prevent a distal endoleak. Buttock claudication is rare when coils are placed in the proximal hypogastric artery rather than at its bifurcation or in its branches.

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KW - Aneurysm, iliac

KW - Hypogastric artery, occlusion

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