Hyperlipidemia secondary to acitretin therapy for lamellar ichthyosis associated with a NIPAL4 mutation improves on a plant-based diet and relapses on a standard Western diet

Jonathan C. Lin, Daniele Massera, Mohammad Ghalib, Robert W. Marion, Lauren Graf, Steven R. Cohen, Robert J Ostfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Oral retinoids are commonly prescribed for many dermatological conditions and may induce hyperlipidemia. We document the case of a 35-year-old man taking acitretin for congenital lamellar ichthyosis associated with a homozygous deleterious mutation in NIPAL4 who developed retinoid-induced hyperlipidemia that responded dramatically to a whole-food plant-based (WFPB) diet. On presentation, his diet consisted of chicken, fish, low fat meats and dairy, grains, and some fruits and vegetables. He then adopted a WFPB diet without making changes to his medications. His serum lipid levels dropped and his exercise capacity improved. Five months later, after discontinuing the plant-based diet and returning to his baseline diet, his hyperlipidemia returned and persisted despite adjustments to his medications. After a year and a half, the patient again adopted a plant-based diet and his lipid levels fell sharply again. A WFPB diet helped improve and control serum lipid levels in a patient with retinoid-induced hyperlipidemia. Future interventions should focus on ways to help patients successfully adopt and maintain a WFPB diet, as increased adherence to a healthy lifestyle is associated with greater health benefits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Nutrition ESPEN
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Keywords

  • Acitretin
  • Congenital ichthyosis
  • Hyperlipidemia
  • Plant-based diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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