Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to monovalent 2009 influenza A/H1N1 and seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines in high-risk children

Caroline B. Long, Irene Ramos, Deepa Rastogi, Deepa G. Manwani, Ginger Janow, Marcela Del Rio, Marguerite M. Mayers, Betsy Herold, Ana Fernandez-Sesma, Rebecca Pellett Madan

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Abstract

Objective: Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to monovalent 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1/2009) and seasonal trivalent influenza (TIV) vaccines were evaluated in healthy children and children with asthma, sickle cell disease (SCD), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and solid organ transplantation (SOT). Study design: Blood was collected from 112 subjects at the time of H1N1/2009 vaccination and 46 ± 15 days later for hemagglutination inhibition titers and γ-interferon ELISPOT responses to H1N1/2009 vaccine and TIV; unvaccinated children also received TIV at enrollment. Results: A significant increase in the percentage of subjects with seroprotective hemagglutination inhibition titers to both vaccines was observed in all high-risk groups. Children with asthma and SCD were most likely to achieve seroprotective titers to H1N1/2009, whereas <50% of subjects with SOT and SLE had a seroprotective response. Subjects with SOT and SLE also had lower rates of seroprotection after TIV, and subjects with SLE had the lowest ELISPOT responses to both vaccines. Overall, 73% of healthy children exhibited protective responses to TIV; only 35% achieved seroprotection for H1N1/2009. Conclusions: This evaluation of immune responses to H1N1/2009 in high-risk children suggests suboptimal responses for SOT and SLE subjects, but not for subjects with SCD or asthma. Higher antigen dose, additional dose regimens, or both for immunocompromised children warrant further investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)74-81
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume160
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

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Influenza Vaccines
Human Influenza
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Organ Transplantation
Sickle Cell Anemia
Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Assay
Asthma
Hemagglutination
Vaccines
Pandemics
Interferons
Vaccination
Antigens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to monovalent 2009 influenza A/H1N1 and seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines in high-risk children. / Long, Caroline B.; Ramos, Irene; Rastogi, Deepa; Manwani, Deepa G.; Janow, Ginger; Del Rio, Marcela; Mayers, Marguerite M.; Herold, Betsy; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Madan, Rebecca Pellett.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 160, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 74-81.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Manwani, Deepa G.

AU - Janow, Ginger

AU - Del Rio, Marcela

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