Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer

Emma J. Crosbie, Mark H. Einstein, Silvia Franceschi, Henry C. Kitchener

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

248 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cervical cancer is caused by human papillomavirus infection. Most human papillomavirus infection is harmless and clears spontaneously but persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (especially type 16) can cause cancer of the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus, penis, and oropharynx. The virus exclusively infects epithelium and produces new viral particles only in fully mature epithelial cells. Human papillomavirus disrupts normal cell-cycle control, promoting uncontrolled cell division and the accumulation of genetic damage. Two effective prophylactic vaccines composed of human papillomavirus type 16 and 18, and human papillomavirus type 16, 18, 6, and 11 virus-like particles have been introduced in many developed countries as a primary prevention strategy. Human papillomavirus testing is clinically valuable for secondary prevention in triaging low-grade cytology and as a test of cure after treatment. More sensitive than cytology, primary screening by human papillomavirus testing could enable screening intervals to be extended. If these prevention strategies can be implemented in developing countries, many thousands of lives could be saved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)889-899
Number of pages11
JournalThe Lancet
Volume382
Issue number9895
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Human papillomavirus 16
Human papillomavirus 18
Papillomavirus Infections
Virion
Cell Biology
Vulvar Neoplasms
Human papillomavirus 11
Oropharynx
Penis
Anal Canal
Vagina
Primary Prevention
Secondary Prevention
Cell Cycle Checkpoints
Developed Countries
Cell Division
Developing Countries
Vaccines
Epithelium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Crosbie, E. J., Einstein, M. H., Franceschi, S., & Kitchener, H. C. (2013). Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer. The Lancet, 382(9895), 889-899. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(13)60022-7

Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer. / Crosbie, Emma J.; Einstein, Mark H.; Franceschi, Silvia; Kitchener, Henry C.

In: The Lancet, Vol. 382, No. 9895, 2013, p. 889-899.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crosbie, EJ, Einstein, MH, Franceschi, S & Kitchener, HC 2013, 'Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer', The Lancet, vol. 382, no. 9895, pp. 889-899. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(13)60022-7
Crosbie EJ, Einstein MH, Franceschi S, Kitchener HC. Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer. The Lancet. 2013;382(9895):889-899. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(13)60022-7
Crosbie, Emma J. ; Einstein, Mark H. ; Franceschi, Silvia ; Kitchener, Henry C. / Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer. In: The Lancet. 2013 ; Vol. 382, No. 9895. pp. 889-899.
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