Human immunodeficiency virus in the state of Texas of the United States: Past reflections, present shortcomings, and future needs of the public health response

Ume L. Abbas, Camden J. Hallmark, Marlene McNeese, Vagish Hemmige, Joseph Gathe, Victoria Williams, Brandon Wolf, Maria C. Rodriguez-Barradas

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

A strategy titled “Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America” aims to reduce human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) incidence in the United States by at least 90% by 2030, using diagnosis, treatment, and prevention strategies. Texas is a Southern state that has one of the highest numbers of new HIV diagnoses and people with HIV in the country, and where HIV disproportionately impacts minorities. We retrace the historical epidemic in its largest city, Houston, to illustrate the lessons learned and milestones accomplished, which could serve as guideposts for the future. We examine the current epidemic in Texas, including the achieved levels of HIV testing, treatment continua, and pre-exposure prophylaxis prescription, and compare and contrast these with the national estimates and Plan targets. Our findings call for urgent and accelerated expansion of efforts to end HIV in Texas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalOpen Forum Infectious Diseases
Volume7
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2020

Keywords

  • EHE
  • Epidemic
  • HIV
  • Houston
  • Texas

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Clinical Neurology

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