Housing needs of persons with HIV and AIDS in New York State

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To understand the scope and magnitude of housing needs among persons with HIV/AIDS in New York State. Design: Both housing providers and non-housing providers were identified through state-wide lists and regional resource guides. All identified housing providers and a random sample of identified non-housing providers, by region, were approached. Interviewers conducted telephone interviews with qualified representatives from each organization. Respondents: All major providers of HIV/AIDS housing services (n = 144) and a random sample of other providers of HIV/AIDS services (n = 87) were interviewed. Variables Under Study: Data that were gathered included: agency profiles, client demographics, and clients' need for and use of housing services. Results: One-third of housing agency clients were either homeless or living in a welfare hotel, while one-tenth of non-housing agency clients lived under such conditions. Nearly one-third of all clients were living doubled-up, and half had problems paying for rent or utilities. The majority of clients required supportive services such as substance abuse treatment or mental health care. Conclusions: With the advent of protease inhibitor therapy, stable and adequate housing has become especially critical for persons with HIV/AIDS. However, public assistance 'reforms' are likely to exacerbate their housing needs, and may ultimately compromise the potential benefits of treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)61-74
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Health and Social Policy
Volume13
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2001

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acquired immune deficiency syndrome
human immunodeficiency virus
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
AIDS
housing
HIV
human being
random sample
housing agency
mental health
Public Assistance
Interviews
telephone interview
health care
housing need
inhibitor
rent
substance abuse
compromise
Protease Inhibitors

Keywords

  • Assessment
  • Housing
  • Needs
  • New York
  • Providers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Geography, Planning and Development

Cite this

Housing needs of persons with HIV and AIDS in New York State. / Bonuck, Karen A.

In: Journal of Health and Social Policy, Vol. 13, No. 2, 2001, p. 61-74.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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