Home- versus office-based buprenorphine inductions for opioid-dependent patients

Nancy L. Sohler, Xuan Li, Hillary V. Kunins, Galit Sacajiu, Angela Giovanniello, Susan Whitley, Chinazo O. Cunningham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent legislation permits the treatment of opioid-dependent patients with buprenorphine in the primary care setting, opening doors for the development of new treatment models for opioid dependence. We modified national buprenorphine treatment guidelines to emphasize patient self-management by giving patients the opportunity to choose to have buprenorphine inductions at home or the physician's office. We examined whether patients who had home-based inductions achieved greater 30-day retention than patients who had traditional office-based inductions in a study of 115 opioid-dependent patients treated in an inner-city health center. Retention was similar in both groups: 50 (78.1%) in office-based group versus 40 (78.4%) in home-based group, p = .97. Several patient characteristics were associated with choosing office- versus home-based inductions, which likely influenced these results. We conclude that opioid dependence can be successfully managed in the primary care setting. Approaches that encourage patient involvement in treatment for opioid dependence can be beneficial.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)153-159
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Substance Abuse Treatment
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010

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Buprenorphine
Opioid Analgesics
Primary Health Care
Group Homes
Patient Participation
Physicians' Offices
Therapeutics
Self Care
Legislation
Guidelines
Health

Keywords

  • Buprenorphine induction
  • Buprenorphine treatment
  • Community health center
  • Opioid dependence
  • Primary care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Home- versus office-based buprenorphine inductions for opioid-dependent patients. / Sohler, Nancy L.; Li, Xuan; Kunins, Hillary V.; Sacajiu, Galit; Giovanniello, Angela; Whitley, Susan; Cunningham, Chinazo O.

In: Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, Vol. 38, No. 2, 03.2010, p. 153-159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sohler, Nancy L. ; Li, Xuan ; Kunins, Hillary V. ; Sacajiu, Galit ; Giovanniello, Angela ; Whitley, Susan ; Cunningham, Chinazo O. / Home- versus office-based buprenorphine inductions for opioid-dependent patients. In: Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment. 2010 ; Vol. 38, No. 2. pp. 153-159.
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