Home environment factors and health behaviors of low-income, overweight, and obese youth

Beth A. Conlon, Aileen P. McGinn, Carmen R. Isasi, Yasmin Mossavar-Rahmani, David W. Lounsbury, Mindy S. Ginsberg, Pamela M. Diamantis, Adriana E. Groisman-Perelstein, Judith Wylie-Rosett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Home environment may influence children's health behaviors associated with obesity. In this study, we examined home environment factors associated with diet and physical activity behaviors of overweight or obese youth. Methods: We analyzed baseline data from child and parent/caregiver dyads enrolled in an urban family weight management program. Multivariable logistic regression examined how home environment (parenting practices, family meal habits, and home availability of fruits/vegetables, sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), screen media, and physical activity resources) are related to children's intake of fruit, vegetables, and SSBs, and moderate-vigorous physical activity and sedentary time (ST) after adjusting for potential confounders. Results: Children were more likely to consume fruit if their families frequently ate meals together and infrequently watched TV during meals, and more likely to consume vegetables with high fruit/vegetable availability and low SSB availability. Children were more likely to engage in ST if parents practiced monitoring and frequently watched TV during meals. Conclusions: Overweight or obese children appear to have healthier habits if their families eat meals together without watching TV and if healthy food choices are available in the home. Encouraging parents to focus these practices may promote healthier body weight in children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)420-436
Number of pages17
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Behavior
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

Fingerprint

Health Behavior
health behavior
low income
meals
Meals
Vegetables
vegetables
Fruit
Beverages
Exercise
parents
Habits
Parents
habits
Family Practice
Parenting
Child Behavior
body weight
Caregivers
dyad

Keywords

  • Children
  • Home environment
  • Nutrition
  • Obesity
  • Parenting
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Home environment factors and health behaviors of low-income, overweight, and obese youth. / Conlon, Beth A.; McGinn, Aileen P.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Lounsbury, David W.; Ginsberg, Mindy S.; Diamantis, Pamela M.; Groisman-Perelstein, Adriana E.; Wylie-Rosett, Judith.

In: American Journal of Health Behavior, Vol. 43, No. 2, 01.03.2019, p. 420-436.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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