HIV incidence among injection drug users in New York City, 1992-1997: Evidence for a declining epidemic

Don C. Des Jarlais, Michael Marmor, Patricia Friedmann, Stephen Titus, Eliza Aviles, Sherry Deren, Lucia Torian, Donna Glebatis, Christopher Murrill, Edgar Monterroso, Samuel R. Friedman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objectives. We assessed recent (1992-1997) HIV incidence in the large HIV epidemic among injection drug users in New York City. Methods. Data were compiled from 10 separate studies (N = 4979), including 6 cohort studies, 2 'repeat service user' studies, and 2 analyses of voluntary HIV testing and counseling services within drug treatment programs. Results. In the 10 studies, 52 seroconversions were found in 6344 person-year at risk. The observed incidence rates among the 10 studies were all within a narrow range, from 0 per 100 person-years at risk to 2.96 per 100 person-years at risk. In 9 of the 10 studies, the observed incidence rate was less than 2 per 100 person-years at risk. The weighted average incidence rate was 0.7 per 100 person-years at risk. Conclusions. The recent incidence rate in New York City is quite low for a high-seroprevalence population of injection drug users. The very large HIV epidemic among injection drugs users in New York City appears to have entered a 'declining phase,' characterized by low incidence and declining prevalence. The data suggest that very large high- seroprevalence HIV epidemics may be 'reversed'.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)352-359
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume90
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Drug Users
HIV
Injections
Incidence
Cohort Studies
HIV Seroprevalence
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Counseling
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Population
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Des Jarlais, D. C., Marmor, M., Friedmann, P., Titus, S., Aviles, E., Deren, S., ... Friedman, S. R. (2000). HIV incidence among injection drug users in New York City, 1992-1997: Evidence for a declining epidemic. American Journal of Public Health, 90(3), 352-359.

HIV incidence among injection drug users in New York City, 1992-1997 : Evidence for a declining epidemic. / Des Jarlais, Don C.; Marmor, Michael; Friedmann, Patricia; Titus, Stephen; Aviles, Eliza; Deren, Sherry; Torian, Lucia; Glebatis, Donna; Murrill, Christopher; Monterroso, Edgar; Friedman, Samuel R.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 90, No. 3, 03.2000, p. 352-359.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Des Jarlais, DC, Marmor, M, Friedmann, P, Titus, S, Aviles, E, Deren, S, Torian, L, Glebatis, D, Murrill, C, Monterroso, E & Friedman, SR 2000, 'HIV incidence among injection drug users in New York City, 1992-1997: Evidence for a declining epidemic', American Journal of Public Health, vol. 90, no. 3, pp. 352-359.
Des Jarlais, Don C. ; Marmor, Michael ; Friedmann, Patricia ; Titus, Stephen ; Aviles, Eliza ; Deren, Sherry ; Torian, Lucia ; Glebatis, Donna ; Murrill, Christopher ; Monterroso, Edgar ; Friedman, Samuel R. / HIV incidence among injection drug users in New York City, 1992-1997 : Evidence for a declining epidemic. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2000 ; Vol. 90, No. 3. pp. 352-359.
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