HIV-associated lymphoma

The evidence for treating aggressively but with caution

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE OF THE REVIEW: The aim of this article is to review key reports regarding the biology and management of HIV-associated lymphoma during the past year. RECENT FINDINGS: The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been associated with a reduced risk of primary cerebral and systemic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a stable or slightly increased risk of Hodgkin's lymphoma, and improved prognosis for those who develop HIV-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma or Hodgkin's lymphoma. Emerging evidence suggests that patients with HIV-associated lymphoma should be treated in a similar manner as immunocompetent patients with the same disease, especially if the CD4 count is 50-100 cells/μl or higher. Use of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab in combination with chemotherapy appears to result in improved control of B-cell lymphoma, but may come at the expense of an increased risk of bacterial and viral infections. SUMMARY: Although the evidence currently supports an aggressive and curative approach for the management of HIV-associated lymphoma, clinicians must be vigilant about implementing infection prophylaxis and promptly recognizing, diagnosing, and treating bacterial, parasitic, fungal, and viral infections that may occur as a consequence of therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)458-463
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Oncology
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2007

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Lymphoma
HIV
Virus Diseases
Hodgkin Disease
Bacterial Infections
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Parasitic Diseases
Mycoses
Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy
B-Cell Lymphoma
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Combination Drug Therapy
Monoclonal Antibodies
Infection
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • AIDS-associated lymphoma
  • HIV infection
  • HIV-associated lymphoma
  • Hodgkin's lymphoma
  • Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

Cite this

HIV-associated lymphoma : The evidence for treating aggressively but with caution. / Sparano, Joseph A.

In: Current Opinion in Oncology, Vol. 19, No. 5, 09.2007, p. 458-463.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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