High-pathogenicity island of Yersinia spp. in Escherichia coli strains isolated from diarrhea patients in China

J. G. Xu, B. Cheng, X. Wen, S. Cui, C. Ye

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The high-pathogenicity island (HPI) of Yersinia has been observed in 93% of 60 enteroadhesive Escherichia coli strains and 80% of E. coli strains isolated from blood samples. In the present study we investigated 671 fecal samples from patients with diarrhea in Shandong Province, China, and isolated HPI-harboring E. coli from 6.26% of the samples. The isolation rates for patients with diarrhea in three age groups, 10 to 20, 30 to 40, and 50 to 60 years, were 6.70, 12.35, and 10.81%, respectively. Therefore, HPI-harboring E. coli is the third most frequently isolated enteric pathogen from patients with diarrhea. Vomiting and abdominal pain were recorded for 33.33 and 66.67% of the patients, respectively. Stools with blood were observed for 9.52% of the patients. Twenty-four of 42 (57%) patients experienced a temperature over 37.4°C. These observations indicate that HPI-harboring E. coli is one of the major causes of diarrheal disease in China and that the clinical symptoms caused by HPI-harboring E. coli differ from those caused by enteroadhesive E. coli.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4672-4675
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume38
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Genomic Islands
Yersinia
Diarrhea
China
Escherichia coli
Patient Isolation
Abdominal Pain
Vomiting
Age Groups
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

High-pathogenicity island of Yersinia spp. in Escherichia coli strains isolated from diarrhea patients in China. / Xu, J. G.; Cheng, B.; Wen, X.; Cui, S.; Ye, C.

In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, Vol. 38, No. 12, 01.12.2000, p. 4672-4675.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "The high-pathogenicity island (HPI) of Yersinia has been observed in 93{\%} of 60 enteroadhesive Escherichia coli strains and 80{\%} of E. coli strains isolated from blood samples. In the present study we investigated 671 fecal samples from patients with diarrhea in Shandong Province, China, and isolated HPI-harboring E. coli from 6.26{\%} of the samples. The isolation rates for patients with diarrhea in three age groups, 10 to 20, 30 to 40, and 50 to 60 years, were 6.70, 12.35, and 10.81{\%}, respectively. Therefore, HPI-harboring E. coli is the third most frequently isolated enteric pathogen from patients with diarrhea. Vomiting and abdominal pain were recorded for 33.33 and 66.67{\%} of the patients, respectively. Stools with blood were observed for 9.52{\%} of the patients. Twenty-four of 42 (57{\%}) patients experienced a temperature over 37.4°C. These observations indicate that HPI-harboring E. coli is one of the major causes of diarrheal disease in China and that the clinical symptoms caused by HPI-harboring E. coli differ from those caused by enteroadhesive E. coli.",
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