High HCV cure rates among people who inject drugs and have suboptimal adherence: A patient-centered approach to HCV models of care

Brianna L. Norton, Matthew J. Akiyama, Julia H. Arnsten, Linda Agyemang, Moonseong Heo, Alain H. Litwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Though people who inject drugs (PWID) make up the majority of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) epidemic, concerns about adherence often exclude PWID from receiving direct-acting antiviral (DAA) medication. The most effective models of HCV care to promote sustained virologic response (SVR) and high adherence need to be evaluated. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study in three opioid treatment programs (OTPs) in the Bronx, NY. Participants, in collaboration with providers, chose one of three models of onsite care: directly observed therapy (mDOT), group treatment (GT), or self-administered individual treatment (SIT). SVR12, daily adherence, and participant characteristics were compared between groups. Results: Of 61 participants, the majority were male (62%) and Latino (67%), with a mean age of 53 (SD 9). Participants received DAAs via one of three models of care: mDOT (21%), GT (25%), or SIT (54%). The majority (59%) used illicit drugs during treatment. Overall, SVR12 was 98% with no differences between models of care: mDOT (100%), GT (100%), and SIT (97%) (p = 1.0). Overall, daily adherence was 73% (SD 16); 86% among those who chose mDOT compared to 71% among those who chose GT (p<0.01) and 73% among those who chose SIT (p<0.01). Conclusion: Despite ongoing illicit drug use and suboptimal adherence, SVR12 was high among PWID treated onsite at an OTP using any one of three models of care. Shared decision making in real world settings may be key to choosing the appropriate model of care for PWID.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number103135
JournalInternational Journal of Drug Policy
Volume93
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021

Keywords

  • HCV
  • OAT
  • PWID
  • Patient centered interventions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy

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