Hepatitis C infection is associated with lower lipids and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in HIV-infected men

Michelle Floris-Moore, Andrea A. Howard, Yungtai Lo, Ellie Schoenbaum, Julia H. Arnsten, Robert S. Klein

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Abstract

Increased cardiovascular risk has been linked to HIV infection and combination antiretroviral therapy, but the impact of hepatitis C virus (HCV) status on indices of cardiovascular risk has not been routinely assessed in the HIV-infected population. The objective of this study was to analyze associations of HCV, HIV, and combination antiretroviral therapy with lipid levels and C-reactive protein (CRP) among older men. We measured fasting total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglyceride, and high-sensitivity CRP serum levels in a cross-sectional study of 108 HIV-infected and 74 HIV-uninfected at-risk older men. One hundred ten men (60%) had detectable HCV RNA, with no difference by HIV status (p = 0.25). The majority (88%) of men with HCV infection had a history of injection drug use. Among all men, HCV infection was independently associated with lower total cholesterol (p < 0.001), LDL-C (p < 0.001), triglycerides (p = 0.01), and CRP (p < 0.001). Among HIV-infected men, HCV infection was associated with lower total cholesterol (p < 0.001), LDL-C (p < 0.001), and CRP (p = 0.004). HCV infection was associated with lower triglycerides among men on protease inhibitors (PI) (p = 0.02) and non-PI combination antiretroviral therapy (p = 0.02), but not among antiretroviral-naïve men. These findings demonstrate an association of lower serum lipid and CRP levels with HCV infection and suggest that HCV status should be assessed as an important correlate of cardiovascular risk factors in studies of older men with or at risk for HIV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)479-491
Number of pages13
JournalAIDS Patient Care and STDs
Volume21
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2007

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Hepatitis C
Hepacivirus
C-Reactive Protein
HIV
Lipids
Virus Diseases
Infection
LDL Cholesterol
Triglycerides
Cholesterol
Protease Inhibitors
Serum
HDL Cholesterol
HIV Infections
Fasting
Therapeutics
Cross-Sectional Studies
RNA
Injections
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Leadership and Management
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Hepatitis C infection is associated with lower lipids and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in HIV-infected men. / Floris-Moore, Michelle; Howard, Andrea A.; Lo, Yungtai; Schoenbaum, Ellie; Arnsten, Julia H.; Klein, Robert S.

In: AIDS Patient Care and STDs, Vol. 21, No. 7, 07.2007, p. 479-491.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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