Hepatic dysfunction increases length of stay and risk of death after injury

Brian G. Harbrecht, Mazen S. Zenati, Howard Doyle, John McMichael, Ricard N. Townsend, Keith D. Clancy, Andrew B. Peitzman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The relative importance of dysfunction or failure of different organ systems to recovery from critical illness is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of hepatic dysfunction to outcome after injury. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated patients admitted to our trauma center from 1994 to 1998 for the development of hepatic dysfunction, defined as serum bilirubin ≥ 2.0 mg/dL. Additional variables on patient demographics, injuries, hospital course, and development of other organ system dysfunction were collected from the trauma registry and hospital records. Results: Using logistic regression analysis, hepatic dysfunction was significantly associated with increased intensive care unit length of stay (LOS) and death. The added development of hepatic dysfunction significantly increased LOS in patients with no other organ dysfunction, those with renal dysfunction, and those with respiratory dysfunction. Conclusion: Hepatic dysfunction influences recovery after injury independent of the dysfunction of other organ systems. The development of hepatic dysfunction prolongs LOS and increases mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)517-523
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume53
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Length of Stay
Liver
Wounds and Injuries
Hospital Records
Trauma Centers
Bilirubin
Critical Illness
Intensive Care Units
Registries
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Demography
Kidney
Mortality
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Harbrecht, B. G., Zenati, M. S., Doyle, H., McMichael, J., Townsend, R. N., Clancy, K. D., & Peitzman, A. B. (2002). Hepatic dysfunction increases length of stay and risk of death after injury. Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, 53(3), 517-523.

Hepatic dysfunction increases length of stay and risk of death after injury. / Harbrecht, Brian G.; Zenati, Mazen S.; Doyle, Howard; McMichael, John; Townsend, Ricard N.; Clancy, Keith D.; Peitzman, Andrew B.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 53, No. 3, 09.2002, p. 517-523.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harbrecht, BG, Zenati, MS, Doyle, H, McMichael, J, Townsend, RN, Clancy, KD & Peitzman, AB 2002, 'Hepatic dysfunction increases length of stay and risk of death after injury', Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, vol. 53, no. 3, pp. 517-523.
Harbrecht BG, Zenati MS, Doyle H, McMichael J, Townsend RN, Clancy KD et al. Hepatic dysfunction increases length of stay and risk of death after injury. Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care. 2002 Sep;53(3):517-523.
Harbrecht, Brian G. ; Zenati, Mazen S. ; Doyle, Howard ; McMichael, John ; Townsend, Ricard N. ; Clancy, Keith D. ; Peitzman, Andrew B. / Hepatic dysfunction increases length of stay and risk of death after injury. In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care. 2002 ; Vol. 53, No. 3. pp. 517-523.
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