Heart rate variability in non-apneic snorers and controls before and after continuous positive airway pressure

Gregory J. Gates, Susan E. Mateika, Jason H. Mateika

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We hypothesized that sympathetic nervous system activity (SNSA) is increased and parasympathetic nervous system activity (PNSA) is decreased during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in non-apneic, otherwise healthy, snoring individuals compared to control. Moreover, we hypothesized that these alterations in snoring individuals would be more evident during non-snoring than snoring when compared to control. Methods: To test these hypotheses, heart rate variability was used to measure PNSA and SNSA in 11 normotensive non-apneic snorers and 12 control subjects before and 7-days after adapting to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP). Results: Our results showed that SNSA was increased and PNSA was decreased in non-apneic snorers during NREM compared to control. However, these changes were only evident during the study in which snoring was eliminated with nCPAP. Conversely, during periods of snoring SNSA and PNSA were similar to measures obtained from the control group. Additionally, within the control group, SNSA and PNSA did not vary before and after nCPAP application. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that long-lasting alterations in autonomic function may exist in snoring subjects that are otherwise healthy. Moreover, we speculate that because of competing inputs (i.e. inhibitory versus excitatory inputs) to the autonomic nervous system during snoring, the full impact of snoring on autonomic function is most evident during non-snoring periods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number9
JournalBMC Pulmonary Medicine
Volume5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 27 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Snoring
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure
Parasympathetic Nervous System
Heart Rate
Sympathetic Nervous System
Eye Movements
Control Groups
Autonomic Nervous System
Healthy Volunteers
Sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Heart rate variability in non-apneic snorers and controls before and after continuous positive airway pressure. / Gates, Gregory J.; Mateika, Susan E.; Mateika, Jason H.

In: BMC Pulmonary Medicine, Vol. 5, 9, 27.07.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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