Headache-related health resource utilisation in chronic and episodic migraine across six countries

Joanna C. Sanderson, Emily B. Devine, Richard B. Lipton, Lisa M. Bloudek, Sepideh F. Varon, Andrew M. Blumenfeld, Peter J. Goadsby, Dawn C. Buse, Sean D. Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To describe headache-related health resource usage in chronic and episodic migraine across six countries. Methods: A web-based questionnaire eliciting data on several topics, including health resource usage, was administered to panellists with migraine from the USA, Canada, UK, Germany, France and Australia. Respondents were grouped into episodic and chronic migraine, based on reported headache phenotype and headache-day frequency. ORs were calculated, comparing usage in each country to that in the US, controlling for chronic versus episodic migraine and other factors. Results: Relative to the USA, the odds of visiting a provider for headache during the preceding 3 months were significantly higher in all countries, except Germany. Respondents in France were more likely to report having a provider they typically visited for headache-related care. The odds of visiting the emergency department for headache were significantly lower in France, the UK and Germany, and hospitalisation for headache was significantly more frequent in Canada and Australia. Respondents from all countries, except Canada, were more likely to report currently using a prescription-acute treatment, and those from France were more likely to report trying more than three acute treatments. Preventive treatment use did not differ significantly. Conclusions: Headache-related resource usage differed significantly between the USA and other countries. US respondents were generally less likely to report recent provider visits and use of prescription-acute treatments. They were more likely to report emergency department visits than in European countries, but less likely to report hospitalisation than in Canada and Australia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1309-1317
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry
Volume84
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

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Health Resources
Migraine Disorders
Headache
France
Canada
Germany
Prescriptions
Hospital Emergency Service
Hospitalization
Health
Resources
Therapeutics
Surveys and Questionnaires
Phenotype
Emergency
Prescription

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Surgery
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Headache-related health resource utilisation in chronic and episodic migraine across six countries. / Sanderson, Joanna C.; Devine, Emily B.; Lipton, Richard B.; Bloudek, Lisa M.; Varon, Sepideh F.; Blumenfeld, Andrew M.; Goadsby, Peter J.; Buse, Dawn C.; Sullivan, Sean D.

In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, Vol. 84, No. 12, 12.2013, p. 1309-1317.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sanderson, JC, Devine, EB, Lipton, RB, Bloudek, LM, Varon, SF, Blumenfeld, AM, Goadsby, PJ, Buse, DC & Sullivan, SD 2013, 'Headache-related health resource utilisation in chronic and episodic migraine across six countries', Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, vol. 84, no. 12, pp. 1309-1317. https://doi.org/10.1136/jnnp-2013-305197
Sanderson, Joanna C. ; Devine, Emily B. ; Lipton, Richard B. ; Bloudek, Lisa M. ; Varon, Sepideh F. ; Blumenfeld, Andrew M. ; Goadsby, Peter J. ; Buse, Dawn C. ; Sullivan, Sean D. / Headache-related health resource utilisation in chronic and episodic migraine across six countries. In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry. 2013 ; Vol. 84, No. 12. pp. 1309-1317.
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