HCV and HBV testing acceptability and knowledge among urban emergency department patients and pharmacy clients

Yvette Calderon, Ethan Cowan, Christopher Schramm, Sam Stern, Christopher Brusalis, Mark Iscoe, Sara Rahman, Rajesh Verma, Jason Leider

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Hepatitis C and hepatitis B are public health problems in the United States and remain largely undiagnosed. In response to the availability of rapid, point of care hepatitis tests, we assessed hepatitis knowledge and acceptability of hepatitis testing during an emergency department (ED) or pharmacy visit. Methods: From June 2010 to May 2011, an anonymous prospective survey was administered to a convenience sample of New York City ED patients and pharmacy clients. Results: The study population (N. = 2078) was 54% female, 36% Hispanic and 41% black. Mean age was 39, SD ± 15. years. The majority (72%;1480/2,2060) of the participants responded that they would get tested if free testing were offered, and 67% (1272/1912) of those responded that they would test for hepatitis B/C in conjunction with HIV. Participants who had previously tested for hepatitis had higher mean knowledge scores than those who had never tested. Pharmacy clients, those of black race, and those with higher mean knowledge scores would be more willing to accept hepatitis B/C testing if offered. Conclusions: Urban ED patients and pharmacy clients were receptive to hepatitis testing. Most individuals would elect to be tested for hepatitis with HIV, which raises the possibility of integrated testing. •ED patients and pharmacy clients were receptive to the idea of hepatitis B/C testing.•Most would elect to be tested for hepatitis B/C together with a test for HIV.•Future research should explore integrated testing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-33
Number of pages5
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume61
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Hepatitis
Hospital Emergency Service
Hepatitis C
Hepatitis B
HIV
Point-of-Care Systems
Hispanic Americans
Public Health
Population

Keywords

  • Emergency medicine
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV
  • Knowledge
  • Pharmacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

HCV and HBV testing acceptability and knowledge among urban emergency department patients and pharmacy clients. / Calderon, Yvette; Cowan, Ethan; Schramm, Christopher; Stern, Sam; Brusalis, Christopher; Iscoe, Mark; Rahman, Sara; Verma, Rajesh; Leider, Jason.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 61, 01.04.2014, p. 29-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Calderon, Yvette ; Cowan, Ethan ; Schramm, Christopher ; Stern, Sam ; Brusalis, Christopher ; Iscoe, Mark ; Rahman, Sara ; Verma, Rajesh ; Leider, Jason. / HCV and HBV testing acceptability and knowledge among urban emergency department patients and pharmacy clients. In: Preventive Medicine. 2014 ; Vol. 61. pp. 29-33.
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