Hard wiring of normal tissue-specific chromosome-wide gene expression levels is an additional factor driving cancer type-specific aneuploidies

Sushant Patkar, Kerstin Heselmeyer-Haddad, Noam Auslander, Daniela Hirsch, Jordi Camps, Daniel Bronder, Markus Brown, Wei Dong Chen, Rachel Lokanga, Darawalee Wangsa, Danny Wangsa, Yue Hu, Annette Lischka, Rüdiger Braun, Georg Emons, B. Michael Ghadimi, Jochen Gaedcke, Marian Grade, Cristina Montagna, Yuri LazebnikMichael J. Difilippantonio, Jens K. Habermann, Gert Auer, Eytan Ruppin, Thomas Ried

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Many carcinomas have recurrent chromosomal aneuploidies specific to the tissue of tumor origin. The reason for this specificity is not completely understood. Methods: In this study, we looked at the frequency of chromosomal arm gains and losses in different cancer types from the The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and compared them to the mean gene expression of each chromosome arm in corresponding normal tissues of origin from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) database, in addition to the distribution of tissue-specific oncogenes and tumor suppressors on different chromosome arms. Results: This analysis revealed a complex picture of factors driving tumor karyotype evolution in which some recurrent chromosomal copy number reflect the chromosome arm-wide gene expression levels of the their normal tissue of tumor origin. Conclusions: We conclude that the cancer type-specific distribution of chromosomal arm gains and losses is potentially “hardwiring” gene expression levels characteristic of the normal tissue of tumor origin, in addition to broadly modulating the expression of tissue-specific tumor driver genes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number93
JournalGenome Medicine
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

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