HABIT efficacy and sustainability trial, a multi-center randomized controlled trial to improve hydroxyurea adherence in youth with sickle cell disease: A study protocol

Arlene Smaldone, Deepa Manwani, Banu Aygun, Kim Smith-Whitley, Haomiao Jia, Jean Marie Bruzzese, Sally Findley, Joshua Massei, Nancy S. Green

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Hydroxyurea (HU) is recommended as standard practice for youth with sickle cell disease (SCD). Yet, despite its efficacy, HU adherence in adolescents and young adults is often poor. Poor medication adherence increases disease burden, healthcare cost and widens health disparities. Adolescence is a critical time to improve adherence through improved chronic disease self-management. This study aims to test the efficacy of an intervention delivered to youth/parent dyads by community health workers (CHWs), augmented by tailored text messages on HU adherence (primary outcome). Secondary outcomes are intervention sustainability, youth health-related quality of life, self-management responsibility concordance, acute hospital use and self-reported disease symptoms. Methods: Hydroxyurea Adherence for Personal Best in Sickle Cell Disease, "HABIT," is a 12 month multi-center randomized controlled trial. One hundred four youth, 10 to 18 years of age prescribed HU who meet eligibility criteria, enrolled with their parent as dyads, will be randomized 1:1 to either the HABIT intervention or to usual clinical care plus education handouts. All subjects will complete clinic visits at months 0, 2, 4, 6 (efficacy component), 9 and 12 (sustainability component) for assessment of HbF biomarker, other hematologic parameters, and to complete questionnaires. In addition, dyads assigned to the HABIT intervention will work with CHWs to identify a daily habit (e.g., brushing teeth) on which to build a HU adherence habit. Tailored daily text message reminders to support the habit will be developed by the dyad in collaboration with the CHWs and sent to parent and youth. At the 6 month visit, the intervention will end and the sustainability portion of the trial will begin. All data analyses will be based on intention to treat with all randomized subjects included in the analyses. Discussion: Prior retrospective studies demonstrate that a majority of adolescents are poorly adherent to HU. If efficacious, the HABIT intervention has the potential to improve the lives of youth with SCD. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT03462511. Registered March 6, 2018, last updated July 26, 2019.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number354
JournalBMC Pediatrics
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2019

Fingerprint

Hydroxyurea
Sickle Cell Anemia
Randomized Controlled Trials
Text Messaging
Habits
Self Care
Medication Adherence
Ambulatory Care
Disease Management
Health Care Costs
Young Adult
Tooth
Chronic Disease
Retrospective Studies
Biomarkers
Quality of Life
Education
Health

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Community health workers
  • Health related quality of life
  • Hydroxyurea
  • Mobile health
  • Randomized controlled trial
  • Sickle cell disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

HABIT efficacy and sustainability trial, a multi-center randomized controlled trial to improve hydroxyurea adherence in youth with sickle cell disease : A study protocol. / Smaldone, Arlene; Manwani, Deepa; Aygun, Banu; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Jia, Haomiao; Bruzzese, Jean Marie; Findley, Sally; Massei, Joshua; Green, Nancy S.

In: BMC Pediatrics, Vol. 19, No. 1, 354, 15.10.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smaldone, Arlene ; Manwani, Deepa ; Aygun, Banu ; Smith-Whitley, Kim ; Jia, Haomiao ; Bruzzese, Jean Marie ; Findley, Sally ; Massei, Joshua ; Green, Nancy S. / HABIT efficacy and sustainability trial, a multi-center randomized controlled trial to improve hydroxyurea adherence in youth with sickle cell disease : A study protocol. In: BMC Pediatrics. 2019 ; Vol. 19, No. 1.
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AU - Aygun, Banu

AU - Smith-Whitley, Kim

AU - Jia, Haomiao

AU - Bruzzese, Jean Marie

AU - Findley, Sally

AU - Massei, Joshua

AU - Green, Nancy S.

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