Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 14

Brace therapy as an adjunct to or substitute for lumbar fusion

Andrew T. Dailey, Zoher Ghogawala, Tanvir F. Choudhri, William C. Watters, Daniel K. Resnick, Alok Sharan, Jason C. Eck, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Jeffrey C. Wang, Michael W. Groff, Sanjay S. Dhall, Michael G. Kaiser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The utilization of orthotic devices for lumbar degenerative disease has been justified from both a prognostic and therapeutic perspective. As a prognostic tool, bracing is applied prior to surgery to determine if immobilization of the spine leads to symptomatic relief and thus justify the performance of a fusion. Since bracing does not eliminate motion, the validity of this assumption is questionable. Only one low-level study has investigated the predictive value of bracing prior to surgery. No correlation between response to bracing and fusion outcome was observed; therefore a trial of preoperative bracing is not recommended. Based on low-level evidence, the use of bracing is not recommended for the prevention of low-back pain in a general working population, since the incidence of low-back pain and impact on productivity were not reduced. However, in laborers with a history of back pain, a positive impact on lost workdays was observed when bracing was applied. Bracing is recommended as an option for treatment of subacute low-back pain, as several higher-level studies have demonstrated an improvement in pain scores and function. The use of bracing following instrumented posterolateral fusion, however, is not recommended, since equivalent outcomes have been demonstrated with or without the application of a brace.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-101
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery: Spine
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Braces
Low Back Pain
Spine
Guidelines
Orthotic Devices
Back Pain
Immobilization
Therapeutics
Pain
Incidence
Population

Keywords

  • Brace
  • Bracing
  • Low-back pain
  • Lumbar fusion
  • Practice guidelines
  • Spine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery
  • Neurology

Cite this

Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 14 : Brace therapy as an adjunct to or substitute for lumbar fusion. / Dailey, Andrew T.; Ghogawala, Zoher; Choudhri, Tanvir F.; Watters, William C.; Resnick, Daniel K.; Sharan, Alok; Eck, Jason C.; Mummaneni, Praveen V.; Wang, Jeffrey C.; Groff, Michael W.; Dhall, Sanjay S.; Kaiser, Michael G.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, Vol. 21, No. 1, 2014, p. 91-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dailey, AT, Ghogawala, Z, Choudhri, TF, Watters, WC, Resnick, DK, Sharan, A, Eck, JC, Mummaneni, PV, Wang, JC, Groff, MW, Dhall, SS & Kaiser, MG 2014, 'Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 14: Brace therapy as an adjunct to or substitute for lumbar fusion', Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 91-101. https://doi.org/10.3171/2014.4.SPINE14282
Dailey, Andrew T. ; Ghogawala, Zoher ; Choudhri, Tanvir F. ; Watters, William C. ; Resnick, Daniel K. ; Sharan, Alok ; Eck, Jason C. ; Mummaneni, Praveen V. ; Wang, Jeffrey C. ; Groff, Michael W. ; Dhall, Sanjay S. ; Kaiser, Michael G. / Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 14 : Brace therapy as an adjunct to or substitute for lumbar fusion. In: Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine. 2014 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 91-101.
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