Glycemic control in pediatric type 1 diabetes: Role of caregiver literacy

Krishnavathana Hassan, Rubina A. Heptulla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Poorly controlled diabetes may occur because caregivers of children with type 1 diabetes fail to comprehend provided diabetes education. We hypothesized that poorly controlled diabetes is associated with lower literacy/numerical skills of caregivers of children with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Primary caregivers were evaluated by using Newest Vital Sign (NVS) and a sociodemographic questionnaire. The NVS identifies individuals who are at risk for low health literacy by measuring general literacy/numeracy skills and yields an overall estimate of health literacy. The NVS scores are interpreted to suggest inadequate, limited, or adequate literacy. RESULTS: Two hundred caregivers of children who had type 1 diabetes with mean hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) of 8.8 ± 1.9%, age of 11.8 ± 3.7 years, duration of disease of 4.8 ± 3.3 years, and BMI of 20.8 ± 4.4 kg/m2 participated. HbA1c in those of inadequate literacy (10.4 ± 2.2%) was significantly higher than in those of adequate literacy (8.6 ± 1.7%; P < .001). HbA1c in those whose caregivers had limited literacy (9.5 ± 2.2%) did not differ significantly from the other 2 groups. On adjusting for independent covariates, we found that children whose caregivers had at least 50% correct math answers had better glycemic control (8.5 ± 1.7%) than those who failed (9.8 ± 2.1%; P < .0005). CONCLUSIONS: Literacy and numerical skills of caregivers signifi-cantly influence glycemic control of their children with type 1 diabetes. Assessing literacy/numeracy skills of caregivers and addressing these deficiencies may be crucial in optimizing glycemic control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatrics
Volume125
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Caregivers
Pediatrics
Vital Signs
Health Literacy
Hemoglobins
Literacy
Education

Keywords

  • Caregivers
  • Children
  • Diabetes
  • Literacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Glycemic control in pediatric type 1 diabetes : Role of caregiver literacy. / Hassan, Krishnavathana; Heptulla, Rubina A.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 125, No. 5, 05.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hassan, Krishnavathana ; Heptulla, Rubina A. / Glycemic control in pediatric type 1 diabetes : Role of caregiver literacy. In: Pediatrics. 2010 ; Vol. 125, No. 5.
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