Girl with sickle cell disease, abdominal pain, and elevated blood pressure⋯ A missed opportunity

Elizabeth Chuang, Celia Ng, Jacqueline Ehrlich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Physicians may not readily diagnose acute lead intoxication because it has become increasingly uncommon and may not be encountered during clinical training. Clinicians should consider lead poisoning in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain. Unofficial reports of radiologic studies should always be confirmed by checking the official report from the radiologist. If acute lead poisoning is suspected, the BLL should be measured as an emergency test rather than a routine test. BLLs can often be reported within 24 hours. Timely diagnosis followed by appropriate chelation therapy offers the best chance at reducing morbidity and mortality from acute lead intoxication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e31-e35
JournalPediatrics in review
Volume34
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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