Geographic Information System-based Screening for TB, HIV, and Syphilis (GIS-THIS): A Cross-Sectional Study

Neela D. Goswami, Emily J. Hecker, Carter Vickery, Marshall A. Ahearn, Gary M. Cox, David P. Holland, Susanna Naggie, Carla Piedrahita, Ann Mosher, Yvonne Torres, Brianna L. Norton, Sujit Suchindran, Paul H. Park, Debbie Turner, Jason E. Stout

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine the feasibility and case detection rate of a geographic information systems (GIS)-based integrated community screening strategy for tuberculosis, syphilis, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Design: Prospective cross-sectional study of all participants presenting to geographic hot spot screenings in Wake County, North Carolina. Methods: The residences of tuberculosis, HIV, and syphilis cases incident between 1/1/05-12/31/07 were mapped. Areas with high densities of all 3 diseases were designated "hot spots." Combined screening for tuberculosis, HIV, and syphilis were conducted at the hot spots; participants with positive tests were referred to the health department. Results and Conclusions: Participants (N = 247) reported high-risk characteristics: 67% previously incarcerated, 40% had lived in a homeless shelter, and 29% had a history of crack cocaine use. However, 34% reported never having been tested for HIV, and 41% did not recall prior tuberculin skin testing. Screening identified 3% (8/240) of participants with HIV infection, 1% (3/239) with untreated syphilis, and 15% (36/234) with latent tuberculosis infection. Of the eight persons with HIV, one was newly diagnosed and co-infected with latent tuberculosis; he was treated for latent TB and linked to an HIV provider. Two other HIV-positive persons had fallen out of care, and as a result of the study were linked back into HIV clinics. Of 27 persons with latent tuberculosis offered therapy, nine initiated and three completed treatment. GIS-based screening can effectively penetrate populations with high disease burden and poor healthcare access. Linkage to care remains challenging and will require creative interventions to impact morbidity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere46029
JournalPloS one
Volume7
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2012
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Cite this

Goswami, N. D., Hecker, E. J., Vickery, C., Ahearn, M. A., Cox, G. M., Holland, D. P., Naggie, S., Piedrahita, C., Mosher, A., Torres, Y., Norton, B. L., Suchindran, S., Park, P. H., Turner, D., & Stout, J. E. (2012). Geographic Information System-based Screening for TB, HIV, and Syphilis (GIS-THIS): A Cross-Sectional Study. PloS one, 7(10), [e46029]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0046029