Genetics of aging sponsored by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, 2-5 April 1998

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In summary, the meeting was a good reflection of the significant progress that has been made in the elucidation of the genetic component of aging. Probably the most intriguing findings involve the demonstrated possibility that aging and life span can be manipulated using single genes, and that these genes appear to be part of functional pathways involved in either basal metabolism or some aspect of DNA processing. This suggests that metabolically derived somatic damage may drive post-reproductive senescence. Thus far, the main players in this field have been model organisms. However, the next stage could well be dominated by large-scale population-based studies to identify the relevant pathways directly in the human, and establish gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. Nevertheless, model organisms, both invertebrates and vertebrates, will remain indispensable for gene functionalization studies and for testing novel gene variants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBiochimica et Biophysica Acta - Reviews on Cancer
Volume1423
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 29 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Genes
Basal Metabolism
Gene-Environment Interaction
Invertebrates
Vertebrates
DNA
Population

Keywords

  • (Caenorhabditis elegans)
  • Genome stability system
  • Replicative senescence
  • Telomerase
  • Werner syndrome
  • Yeast

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research
  • Biophysics

Cite this

Genetics of aging sponsored by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, 2-5 April 1998. / Vijg, Jan.

In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Reviews on Cancer, Vol. 1423, No. 1, 29.01.1999.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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