Gene therapy in the management of Erectile Dysfunction (ED)

Past, present, and future

Arnold Melman, Kelvin Davies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the past, many researchers considered viral vectors to be the most promising candidates to transfer genetic material into the corpora for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. However, at present, no viral vectors have progressed to human trials. In contrast, the use of naked gene therapy, a plasmid expressing the human Maxi-K potassium channel, is the only gene therapy treatment to be evaluated in clinical phase I trials to date. The success of these studies, proving the safety of this treatment, has paved the way for the development of future gene transfer techniques based on similar transfer methods, as well as novel treatment vectors, such as stem cell transfer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)846-854
Number of pages9
JournalTheScientificWorldJournal
Volume9
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 31 2009

Fingerprint

Gene therapy
Erectile Dysfunction
Genetic Therapy
gene
Gene transfer
gene transfer
Potassium Channels
Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels
Stem cells
plasmid
Gene Transfer Techniques
Clinical Trials, Phase I
Plasmids
Therapeutics
potassium
safety
Stem Cells
Research Personnel
Safety
therapy

Keywords

  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Gene transfer
  • Maxi-K
  • Potassium channels
  • Stem cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Gene therapy in the management of Erectile Dysfunction (ED) : Past, present, and future. / Melman, Arnold; Davies, Kelvin.

In: TheScientificWorldJournal, Vol. 9, 31.08.2009, p. 846-854.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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