Gender differences in lymphocyte populations, plasma HIV RNA levels, and disease progression in a cohort of children born to women infected with HIV

Marc Foca, Jack Moye, Clara Chu, Yvonne Matthews, Ken Rich, Ed Handelsman, Katherine Luzuriaga, Mary Paul, Clemente Diaz, Edna Pacheco-Acosta, Ruth Tuomala, Ellen Cooper, Donna Mesthene, Phil LaRussa, Alice Higgins, Sheldon Landesman, Edward Handelsman, Ava Dennie, Kenneth Rich, Delmyra TurpinWilliam Shearer, Susan Pacheco, Norma Cooper, Joana Rosario, Robert Nugent, Vincent Smeriglio, Katherine Davenny, Bruce Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE.We sought to document gender differences in lymphocyte subsets and plasma RNA levels in a pediatric cohort with presumed minimal hormonal differences (on the basis of age). METHODS. Blood samples from antiretroviral therapy-treated, HIV-infected children (n = 158) and HIV-uninfected children (n = 1801) who were enrolled in the Women and Infants Transmission Study were analyzed at specified study intervals with consensus protocols, and various parameters were compared. RESULTS. Antiretroviral therapy-treated, HIV-infected female children had, on average, 0.38 log10 copies per mL lower plasma RNA levels than did their male counterparts, but lymphocyte differences were not noted in this cohort. Despite their higher plasma RNA level, a greater proportion of male children survived through 8 years of age. There were no gender differences with respect to the age of diagnosis of HIV, time to antiretroviral therapy after diagnosis of HIV, or type of antiretroviral therapy. Lymphocyte differences were noted for uninfected children. CONCLUSIONS. Plasma RNA levels differed among antiretroviral therapy-treated, HIV-infected children according to gender, in a manner similar to that noted in previous pediatric and adult studies. Lymphocyte subsets varied according to gender in a cohort of HIV-exposed but uninfected children. Most importantly, overall mortality rates for this cohort differed according to gender.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)146-155
Number of pages10
JournalPediatrics
Volume118
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Gender
  • HIV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Gender differences in lymphocyte populations, plasma HIV RNA levels, and disease progression in a cohort of children born to women infected with HIV'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this