Gastroesophageal reflux in very low birth weight infants: Association with chronic lung disease and outcomes through 1 year of age

Mamta Fuloria, Deborah Hiatt, Robert G. Dillard, T. Michael O'Shea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To analyze the association between chronic lung disease (CLD) and clinically diagnosed gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, and between GER and outcomes at 1 year adjusted age. METHODS: A total of 375 consecutively born VLBW infants with CLD and 345 gestational age-matched controls were studied. Records were reviewed to ascertain which infants were diagnosed with GER (based on clinical suspicion or confirmatory tests) and which infants had delayed growth or development at 1 year adjusted age. RESULTS: Infants with CLD were treated for GER more frequently than controls (CLD: 27% versus controls: 9%;p < 0.0001). Among infants with CLD, those with and without GER were comparable in terms of the days on supplemental oxygen [124 (64 to 93) vs 121 (47 to 394)] and the proportion with cystic changes on chest radiograph (44% vs 47%). Comparing outcomes at 1 year for infants with and without GER, no differences were found in the rates of Bayley Mental Developmental and Psychomotor Developmental Indices of <70, cerebral palsy, and measurements below the 10th percentile. CONCLUSION: Among VLBW infants, an association exists between CLD and GER, although this association might be due to greater diagnostic suspicion in infants with CLD. In VLBW infants, GER does not appear to increase the risk of delayed growth or development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)235-239
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Perinatology
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2000
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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