Fungal sinusitis: An update

J. F. Morpeth, N. T. Rupp, W. K. Dolen, John P. Bent, F. A. Kuhn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

101 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To review the classification of fungal sinusitis as well as discuss current approaches to diagnosis and management. Data Sources: A MEDLINE literature search was performed using the index terms sinus infection, fungal, diagnosis, radiology, microbiology, and treatment. The search was restricted to the English language and human subjects. With one exception the references were restricted to the last 10 years. Clinical data from studies performed at our institution were also included. Results: Fungal sinusitis can be divided into four primary categories: (1) acute/fulminant (invasive), (2) chronic/indolent (invasive), (3) fungus ball, and (4) allergic fungal sinusitis. Each subtype has unique immunologic, pathologic, and clinical features. Allergic fungal sinusitis is the most recently described and most common form. The treatment and prognosis of fungal sinusitis varies significantly among the four different categories. Conclusion: Recent advances in endoscopy and computed tomography have enhanced the understanding of fungal sinusitis; however, they remain diseases surrounded by controversy. New insights into the etiology and pathogenesis of these diseases along with advances in diagnosis and treatment will lead to improved medical therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)128-140
Number of pages13
JournalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Volume76
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sinusitis
Mycoses
Information Storage and Retrieval
Microbiology
Radiology
MEDLINE
Endoscopy
Fungi
Language
Tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Morpeth, J. F., Rupp, N. T., Dolen, W. K., Bent, J. P., & Kuhn, F. A. (1996). Fungal sinusitis: An update. Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, 76(2), 128-140.

Fungal sinusitis : An update. / Morpeth, J. F.; Rupp, N. T.; Dolen, W. K.; Bent, John P.; Kuhn, F. A.

In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Vol. 76, No. 2, 1996, p. 128-140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morpeth, JF, Rupp, NT, Dolen, WK, Bent, JP & Kuhn, FA 1996, 'Fungal sinusitis: An update', Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, vol. 76, no. 2, pp. 128-140.
Morpeth JF, Rupp NT, Dolen WK, Bent JP, Kuhn FA. Fungal sinusitis: An update. Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 1996;76(2):128-140.
Morpeth, J. F. ; Rupp, N. T. ; Dolen, W. K. ; Bent, John P. ; Kuhn, F. A. / Fungal sinusitis : An update. In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 1996 ; Vol. 76, No. 2. pp. 128-140.
@article{8d1700c707dc4befa469d825be8d96ea,
title = "Fungal sinusitis: An update",
abstract = "Objective: To review the classification of fungal sinusitis as well as discuss current approaches to diagnosis and management. Data Sources: A MEDLINE literature search was performed using the index terms sinus infection, fungal, diagnosis, radiology, microbiology, and treatment. The search was restricted to the English language and human subjects. With one exception the references were restricted to the last 10 years. Clinical data from studies performed at our institution were also included. Results: Fungal sinusitis can be divided into four primary categories: (1) acute/fulminant (invasive), (2) chronic/indolent (invasive), (3) fungus ball, and (4) allergic fungal sinusitis. Each subtype has unique immunologic, pathologic, and clinical features. Allergic fungal sinusitis is the most recently described and most common form. The treatment and prognosis of fungal sinusitis varies significantly among the four different categories. Conclusion: Recent advances in endoscopy and computed tomography have enhanced the understanding of fungal sinusitis; however, they remain diseases surrounded by controversy. New insights into the etiology and pathogenesis of these diseases along with advances in diagnosis and treatment will lead to improved medical therapy.",
author = "Morpeth, {J. F.} and Rupp, {N. T.} and Dolen, {W. K.} and Bent, {John P.} and Kuhn, {F. A.}",
year = "1996",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "76",
pages = "128--140",
journal = "Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology",
issn = "1081-1206",
publisher = "American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fungal sinusitis

T2 - An update

AU - Morpeth, J. F.

AU - Rupp, N. T.

AU - Dolen, W. K.

AU - Bent, John P.

AU - Kuhn, F. A.

PY - 1996

Y1 - 1996

N2 - Objective: To review the classification of fungal sinusitis as well as discuss current approaches to diagnosis and management. Data Sources: A MEDLINE literature search was performed using the index terms sinus infection, fungal, diagnosis, radiology, microbiology, and treatment. The search was restricted to the English language and human subjects. With one exception the references were restricted to the last 10 years. Clinical data from studies performed at our institution were also included. Results: Fungal sinusitis can be divided into four primary categories: (1) acute/fulminant (invasive), (2) chronic/indolent (invasive), (3) fungus ball, and (4) allergic fungal sinusitis. Each subtype has unique immunologic, pathologic, and clinical features. Allergic fungal sinusitis is the most recently described and most common form. The treatment and prognosis of fungal sinusitis varies significantly among the four different categories. Conclusion: Recent advances in endoscopy and computed tomography have enhanced the understanding of fungal sinusitis; however, they remain diseases surrounded by controversy. New insights into the etiology and pathogenesis of these diseases along with advances in diagnosis and treatment will lead to improved medical therapy.

AB - Objective: To review the classification of fungal sinusitis as well as discuss current approaches to diagnosis and management. Data Sources: A MEDLINE literature search was performed using the index terms sinus infection, fungal, diagnosis, radiology, microbiology, and treatment. The search was restricted to the English language and human subjects. With one exception the references were restricted to the last 10 years. Clinical data from studies performed at our institution were also included. Results: Fungal sinusitis can be divided into four primary categories: (1) acute/fulminant (invasive), (2) chronic/indolent (invasive), (3) fungus ball, and (4) allergic fungal sinusitis. Each subtype has unique immunologic, pathologic, and clinical features. Allergic fungal sinusitis is the most recently described and most common form. The treatment and prognosis of fungal sinusitis varies significantly among the four different categories. Conclusion: Recent advances in endoscopy and computed tomography have enhanced the understanding of fungal sinusitis; however, they remain diseases surrounded by controversy. New insights into the etiology and pathogenesis of these diseases along with advances in diagnosis and treatment will lead to improved medical therapy.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030038385&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030038385&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8595530

AN - SCOPUS:0030038385

VL - 76

SP - 128

EP - 140

JO - Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

JF - Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

SN - 1081-1206

IS - 2

ER -